1,187 reputation
513
bio website matt.scharley.me
location Australia
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen May 2 at 3:58

Email: matt@scharley.me
Website: matt.scharley.me
Twitter: @mattscharley
CV: Stackoverflow Careers


May
2
awarded  Revival
May
2
revised Is it correct to ask contributers to rebase their pull requests on github
added 258 characters in body
May
2
answered Is it correct to ask contributers to rebase their pull requests on github
May
2
comment Is it correct to ask contributers to rebase their pull requests on github
@Granko: "Rebase" and "rebase into a single commit" are two separate issues.
Mar
4
comment Difference between networking programming and socket programming
@JerryCoffin: Possibly worth noting that sockets are a subset of IP-based protocols too. There are things like ICMP/IP that aren't covered by sockets either.
Sep
11
awarded  Yearling
Sep
22
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
@ratchetfreak: yea, but if everyone is using their own formatting style and does this then you end up with every third commit being reformatting changes.
Sep
22
comment Is a coding standard even needed any more?
Not to mention that mass reformatting can cause headaches when you throw another good standard in there: source control.
Sep
11
awarded  Yearling
Aug
23
comment Is defining a variable to name a method argument a good practice?
Do you use some kind of IDE? Most will have some sort of way of indicating what the parameters are to the function you are calling which somewhat nullifies the need to do this.
Aug
14
comment Don't Use “Static” in C#?
This is the point that struck me too. A few static and stateless 'helper' style classes are fine, but if you've got a full 25% of all your classes as static, it's unlikely that your efforts are limited to that case.
Mar
25
comment How does a web browser save passwords?
Agreed. Having a master password, puts you back in the same position you are server-side: check only. You can verify the password against a hash, then use the users input if it checks out. There is no need to store it permanently. This is also the mechanism used by some applications to update hash's when they become obsolete. Wait for the user to login, verify against the old hash, then rehash the input while it's still in memory in cleartext and store the new, more secure hash.
Mar
23
comment Do you sign contracts digitally or still on paper? And what do clients think?
On the other hand, signatures with something like PGP if you're engaging someone a little more tech savvy are probably more likely to hold up.
Mar
11
answered Web development: no local server workflow
Mar
11
comment Web development: no local server workflow
@melee: I've been playing with a ruby gem called guard. It monitors the filesystem, and can execute arbitrary commands when something changes. I'm sure you could hook this up easily to rsync or similar, if you can't just use a network share.
Feb
19
accepted Using PHP's ternary operator with only two arguments
Feb
19
revised Using PHP's ternary operator with only two arguments
added 15 characters in body
Feb
19
comment Using PHP's ternary operator with only two arguments
The example given is wrong. A correct usage of the functionality as intended would be $foo = @$bar ?: 'baz' which is equivalent to $foo = (@$bar ? $bar : 'baz'). I do agree with your comments though.
Feb
18
comment Using PHP's ternary operator with only two arguments
At the moment, my 'team' consists purely of me. Hosting isn't an issue as we generally host 98% of the sites we build, and we host on top of 5.3.6. I realise the functionality itself isn't so unusual, just the syntax for it which was the root of my question. There's also the issue where it doesn't act like a null-coalescing operator without more syntax (@ to hide notices about undefined things).
Feb
18
revised Using PHP's ternary operator with only two arguments
added 54 characters in body