21,999 reputation
54384
bio website StackOverflow.Com/users/2988
location Karlsruhe, Germany
age 35
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 3 hours ago

Not a software developer in the sense that I write software as part of my job or otherwise get paid to do so. Also, not a developer in the sense that I write software for others.

I write software for myself, often for no other reason than that I want to. (What I call recreational programming.)

Actually, I’m currently forcibly confined to recreational programming, as I’m looking for a job.

My current go-to language is Ruby, but I’m interested in all sorts of other languages as well: Newspeak, Seph, Ioke, Self, Io, Slate, Reia, Cobra, Fortress, Sapphire, Haskell, Scala, Clojure, Racket, Go, Fancy, Poison, and many more.


1d
comment Is every language written in C?
@Zane: C++ programs don't compile either (unless they are compilers). This entire question is based upon the fact that the OP doesn't understand the fundamental distinction between a programming language and a compiler. It's really not a difficult concept: compilers compile. Not-compilers don't compile. C++ is not a compiler, it is a language, ergo, it doesn't compile. There exist C++ compilers which compile to C (Comeau, for example), but that doesn't mean that C++ compiles to C. There are also interpreters for C++, by that some logic would you say that C++ is an interpreted language?
2d
comment Is every language written in C?
@Zane: C++ is a language. A language is an abstract set of mathematical rules and restrictions. It doesn't compile to anything. Languages don't compile. Compilers compile. Cfront (the first C++ compiler) compiles C++ to C. C++ doesn't compile to anything, because it isn't a compiler, it's a language.
Dec
24
comment Block diagram scheme file format
What (dis-)advantages does this file format have over established ones such as DOT (GraphViz) or OGDL?
Dec
24
answered How did OOP evolve to include the notion of Properties
Dec
24
revised Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
added 459 characters in body
Dec
24
comment Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
Granted, a language design committee is about the worst place to do original PLT research (just ask the ECMAScript 4 committee how that turned out), so that didn't help at all, but even if they hadn't had the committee it would still have taken a long time … just a slightly shorter long time.
Dec
24
comment Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
Well, but C++ also didn't get them when there was only one compiler. Or even before there was a compiler at all. It's not like lambdas were some newfangled esoteric thing at that time. Lisp had them since 1957, Smalltalk since 1972, the "Lambda: the Ultimate …" series of papers was published 1975-1977, all this happened years before C with Classes and over a decade before C++. Lambdas in a language without automatic dynamic memory management are just genuinely hard, and AFAIK C++ was the first one to do it. They were doing original research, and that takes time.
Dec
24
answered Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
Dec
24
comment Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
Your example is not a closure. But it's exactly closures which are the problem. Maybe that's why you can't see the difficulties?
Dec
24
comment Why lambda/closures expressions came so late to C++?
The usefulness of lambdas was well-known, and lambdas in widespread use even back when C++ was designed by a single person, and they also weren't added back then. I'm not sure you can blame it on design-by-committee.
Dec
23
revised Is every language written in C?
deleted 15 characters in body
Dec
23
comment Is every language written in C?
@FrancisDavey: Thanks. I started out compiling the list from memory, then I added dates I didn't remember by looking them up on Wikipedia. After that, I found a timeline of languages on Wikipedia, and picked a few more languages from there. Since the article on BCPL cites 1966, but the timeline cites 1967, I didn't notice that I had already added BCPL. I'll remove the duplicate.
Dec
23
comment How to use multiple programming languages together in the same program?
This question is way too broad. At the very least, there are three questions here: what is a scripting language, how do you use multiple languages together, and why would you use multiple languages together. I'm pretty sure all three of those have already been answered here. So, this question is not only too broad, but also a triple duplicate.
Dec
23
comment How do you unit test a function that clears properties?
Mutable state and side-effects are simply hard to test. There's no way around it. (Maybe that's a reason to avoid them?)
Dec
23
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
23
comment Is every language written in C?
@DanielRHicks: Me and my family benefit a great deal from the fact that, well past retirement age, my dad still makes quite a good living not just maintaining RPG code, but writing new greenfield systems in it as well, so I am a little biased, probably ;-)
Dec
23
comment Is every language written in C?
@DanielRHicks: Correct. Fortran (1954), Lisp (1958), COBOL (1959), APL (1962), BASIC (1964), PL/I (1964), RPG (1964), Forth (1968), LOGO (1968), Pascal (1971), and Smalltalk (1972) are some of the languages that predate C and are still in active use today.
Dec
23
comment How to use multiple programming languages together in the same program?
There is no such thing as a compiled language or an interpreted language. Compilation and interpretation are traits of the compiler or interpreter (duh!) not the language. Languages aren't compiled or interpreted. They just are. Every language can be implemented with a compiler and every language can be implemented with an interpreter. Most languages have both compiled and interpreted implementations. Most modern high-performance implementations are both interpreted and compiled. There are interpreters for C and C++, there are compilers for JavaScript and Lisp.
Dec
23
comment Is every language written in C?
@SebastianGodelet: HotSpot is not an implementation of the Java language. It's an implementation of the JVM bytecode language. Those are two completely different languages. The most widely used implementations of the Java language are javac from the Oracle JDK / OpenJDK written by Martin Odersky (of Scala fame) in 100% Java, the Eclipse Compiler, written in 100% Java (derived from IBM's Jikes compiler), the compiler from IBM's J9, also derived from Jikes and 100% Java. AFAIK, the only Java compiler in somewhat widespread use that is not written in Java is GCJ
Dec
23
awarded  Nice Answer