1,433 reputation
716
bio website
location Brooklyn, NY
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 2 days ago
Good Morning how are you, I'm dr jimbob
I'm interested in things.
I'm not a real dr,
But I am a real jim bob.

Have a PhD in Experimental High-Energy Physics, but left academia in mid-2010 to program professionally.

Mostly program/script in python, django, and jquery these days doing mostly web apps.

Also have experience programming in C, C++, java, haskell, php, and (bash) shell more in the past.

Linux as primary OS since 1999, ubuntu user since 2005 (Hoary).


Dec
12
answered Is there an expiration date for well regarded, but old books on programming?
Dec
12
revised How can I inspire engineers to positively conduct telephone interviews
That backslash in the XML tag was bothering me; the spaces less so, but still shouldn't have been fixed.
Dec
12
comment How can I inspire engineers to positively conduct telephone interviews
@maple_shaft - Agree, Future_proof's SO profile says he's from India. A key may be to get a set of engineers to come up with a set of 1000 simple weed-out questions, so HR can pre-screen candidates. "Your resume says you know C++, say you have a class called Shape, how would you declare the constructor; how would Triangle inherit from Shape". I'd also mention there's a similar pre-screening test when they come in for the actual interview. Also count interview time as equal to a billable hour.
Dec
12
suggested approved edit on How can I inspire engineers to positively conduct telephone interviews
Dec
6
comment Is there a term used when internal variables are declared public and accessible?
@SLott - I do not think we disagree. Public means poor encapsulation only if the variable should be accessed by a class's functions (e.g., getters and setters are keeping something invariant). In python you should use the private access specifier by the _ or __ prefix in the name for encapsulation. If your code frequently uses internal variables marked private when better alternatives exist, that's poor encapsulation. I do agree that's its a waste to write trivial getters/setters for every member variable when they aren't needed (no side effects from accessing/modifying).
Dec
6
comment Is there a term used when internal variables are declared public and accessible?
@S Lott ; Oded - Encapsulation is good and relying on code where private variables are frequently directly accessed from other classes is poor encapsulation. In python, you do this by accessing name-mangled private variables of another class or ignoring conventions of a single underscore prefix (though if your getter is doing other behavior; really should use __ for name mangling). Other languages can have poor encapsulation too, e.g., reflection in Java and pointer arithmetic in C++ to get at private variables. Python just doesn't make the syntax to do it that cumbersome.
Nov
28
answered How to interview a natural scientist for a dev position?
Oct
28
answered Is donationware non-commercial?
Oct
28
answered How good does a well-rounded programmer need to be with bit-wise operations?
Oct
24
answered Is it possible for an amateur to become a good programmer?
Oct
21
answered Is there a Django reference?
Oct
18
revised Are 9 to 5 programmers looked down upon?
added 15 characters in body
Oct
18
answered Are 9 to 5 programmers looked down upon?
Oct
7
revised Do real-world algorithms that greatly outperform in the class below exist?
added 29 characters in body
Oct
7
revised Do real-world algorithms that greatly outperform in the class below exist?
added 400 characters in body
Oct
7
answered Do real-world algorithms that greatly outperform in the class below exist?
Oct
7
answered From Slashdot: Does being a loyal developer pay?
Oct
5
awarded  Commentator
Oct
5
comment Why do iterators in Python raise an exception?
@Yam: I agree. Its not pythonic to take an existing sequence and convert it into an iterator just to apply a for loop to it; the sequence is already an iterable, so the conversion of a list to a listiterator is pointless. I kept the first line only to follow NullUserException's starting point, to explain how you should loop over an iterator, which is the same way you should loop over any iterable (list, set, str, tuple, dict, file, generator, etc.). I could have done something like it = itertools.combinations("ABCDE", 2) to get a better example of a meaningful iterator.
Oct
5
revised Why do iterators in Python raise an exception?
added 421 characters in body