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bio website blueraja.com/blog
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visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 11 hours ago

Jan
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
comment Is Ken Thompson's compiler hack still a threat?
@supercat: You seem to be missing the point. You're saying that the hack Ken Thompson presented can be worked around. I am saying that the particular hack he chose doesn't matter; it was just an example, to demonstrate his larger point that you must always trust someone. That's why this question is somewhat meaningless - it completely misses the forest for the trees.
Jan
26
revised Is Ken Thompson's compiler hack still a threat?
added 60 characters in body
Jan
25
answered Is Ken Thompson's compiler hack still a threat?
Jan
20
awarded  Yearling
Jan
18
comment My boss has a bad case of “Not Invented Here”
Another MS-connect feature request for user-defined functions, which hasn't been closed yet, for those so interested: https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/742002/ssis-package-pa‌​rts-revisited#tabs
Jan
18
comment My boss has a bad case of “Not Invented Here”
Aside from not being compatible with source-control, SSIS still has no user-defined functions, despite it being by-far the most requested feature on Microsoft Connect for many years. Because of this, SSIS solutions tend to be sloppy and have code copied all over the place. More than likely, implementing any non-trivial logic from C# in SSIS would make the code much less clean and much harder to maintain.
Oct
26
revised Why don't research papers that mention custom software release the source code?
added 2 characters in body
Oct
26
answered Why don't research papers that mention custom software release the source code?
Sep
26
comment Return random `list` item by its `weight`
See also
Aug
29
comment Why do we have to use break in switch?
@Jon "And the translation back [to assembly]" would be compiling.
Aug
28
comment Why do we have to use break in switch?
It was a poor decision made by the C-designers (like many decisions, it was made to make the transition from assembly --> C, and the translation back, easier, rather than for ease of programming), which was then unfortunately inherited in other C-based languages. Using the simple rule "Always make the common case the default!!", we can see that the default behaviour should have been to break, with a separate keyword for falling through, since that is by far the most common case.
Aug
21
revised How to explain that sample size does not influence project length
grammar fix
Aug
21
suggested approved edit on How to explain that sample size does not influence project length
Aug
16
answered Reverse engineering: what is it really good for?
Aug
15
comment Asking back technical questions during the interview (as the interviewee)
Not sure I agree with "use lots of terms that lesser developers wouldn't understand" - I often find that it's the lesser-developers who throw around the fancy marketing words (like constantly using the phrase 'n-tier', or naming off every design pattern under the sun), whereas the better developers understand what they are, but only use them in conversation when it's absolutely appropriate, which is pretty rare. This could really make you look bad.
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
@Tacroy: But the question is specifically about programming languages. OP most likely already knows HTML/CSS/Javascript/SQL if he does web-development in PHP; but he's not asking about that. He's asking if learning another programming language would be a good idea.
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
@luis.espinal: Did you read the top answer? (which is definitely "a source" for any claim of "most programmers think"...)
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
@luis.espinal: It's pretty common knowledge. Here's a source.
Aug
8
comment Is it wise to be going back and forth between two programming languages?
Most people only consider something a "Programming language" if it can be used for programming things (ie. is Turing Complete). HTML, XML, Regex, CSS, XPath/XSLT/XQuery are not considered programming languages; neither is the tiny subset of SQL used by most developers.