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Feb
28
comment Is there any reason to use “plain old data” classes?
Can't believe this answer has no votes (well, you have one now). This might be a simple example, but when OO is abused enough you get service classes that turn into nightmares containing tons of functionality that should have been encapsulated in classes.
Feb
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
21
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
comment Why are public and private accessors considered good practice?
Then you need a Coordinate class ;)
Nov
18
comment Programming in academic environment vs industry environment
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner I think there usuall is as teams tend to be larger, and there also tends to be a larger hierarchy of people that need to be briefed at some level. Small companies can't afford bureaucracy :)
Nov
18
answered Why are public and private accessors considered good practice?
Nov
18
comment Programming in academic environment vs industry environment
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner I had more meetings in academia actually. Though I do work in a fairly lean small company that is low on formal process.
Nov
18
answered how to layout good documentation
Nov
18
answered Programming in academic environment vs industry environment
Nov
18
answered HTTP events? Is there a standard / precedent for this?
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Question
May
20
comment Why are there multiple Unicode encodings?
@jfs lol at managing to find something (love) even more complicated than character encoding to use as simple example. Now I'm really confused.
May
4
comment How do you get consistency in source code / UI without stifling developer's creativity?
Your issue may be more to do with the fact you have duplication in the code. e.g. can you extract the date code to one single piece of code that is re-used.
May
4
answered How to teach your users/customers to send better error descriptions
Apr
22
answered Preparation for Ph.D
Apr
22
comment Is there a name for the concept of a hierarchy of many short methods in a class
thanks, this is the type of answer I'm looking for, I'd never heard that expression before, is it commonly used?
Apr
21
revised Is there a name for the concept of a hierarchy of many short methods in a class
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Apr
21
comment Is there a name for the concept of a hierarchy of many short methods in a class
Hmm the template method pattern is similar, but as I stated in my question, I think extracting methods in my case is the right thing to do from a readability POV even if they are private and are not to be overloaded. I'm asking if there's a well known principle that covers why this is.
Apr
21
comment Is there a name for the concept of a hierarchy of many short methods in a class
I know that what I am doing is the extract method refactoring, what I'm really asking is the name for the principle that makes it the right thing to do in my example. E.g. if I had duplicated code, I would also use the extract method refactoring but it would be because of the DRY principle.
Apr
21
revised Is there a name for the concept of a hierarchy of many short methods in a class
added 40 characters in body; added 157 characters in body