143 reputation
17
bio website
location Estonia
age 40
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen 18 hours ago

I'm a developer, (surprise - eh!)

For the last 5 years or so I've been professionally involved in writing Java in and with Eclipse (using big E both - as an IDE and as a platform)

From the past, I still harbour some softness for Python language and web (client side) technologies like HTML, CSS and Javascript. Occasionally dusting off my knowledge of these and keeping them from completely rusting away...

In my more distant youth I've also dabbled in wide range of languages and technologies, starting from BASIC, followed up bu Pascal, bits and pieces of C/C++ (enough to shoot myself in a foot), just a tad bit of assembler (just enough to know that is not the kind of programming I would love to do for any extended period of time), various of dialects of SQL, perl and bunch of stuff that don't even measuer up to being mentioned...


Dec
19
awarded  Critic
Nov
5
awarded  Civic Duty
Oct
23
answered Is staying implementation agnostic really worth it?
Oct
11
comment 3d Packing algorithm for item's shipping
I think the fine sarcasm in this reply got lost in the translation somewhere...
Oct
1
comment How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
@supercat The question was about equivalence of null versus Maybe<T>. While internals of building arrays and lists is an interesting topic, it does not add any value to the larger discussion. As for the nullability of reference types in C#, I readily admint that my last encounter with C# was brief and it has been more than 3 years since I last programmed in C#, so you may well be right about that. In any case, my point was, that Nullable<T> can be used as poor man's Maybe<T> in C#. For all practical purposes they are the same construct.
Oct
1
comment How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
@supercat I think you are derailing the discussion here.
Sep
29
comment How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
@supercat - You are probably having some very specific use case in mind. When creating an array of objects, you usually reserve a sequential block of memory to contain some objects. I do not know enough of C# internals to be 100% certain of what happens under the hood, but whenever you are creating an array, you either know the exact content of an array or you don't. In the latter case, you initialize the array elements to null. Reading the values from array is an entirely separate concern.
Sep
29
comment How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
@svick: In C# (which was the language in question by the OP), null is not an implicit member of every type. For null to be lebal value, you need to define the type to be nullable explicitly, which makes a T? (syntax sugar for Nullable<T>) essentially equivalent to Maybe<T>.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
29
comment Separate Action from Assertion in Unit Tests
@gnat: I added some explanation to my answer...
May
29
awarded  Editor
May
29
revised Separate Action from Assertion in Unit Tests
Added explanation to why I was suggesting alternative frameworks
May
29
comment Separate Action from Assertion in Unit Tests
@gnat: I was answering the "is there another method for accomplishing the same thing?" part of the question. It seems to me that the approach he's taken has been stretched his approach to its limits and perhaps there is another tool that helps him achieve the desired outcome more readily.
May
29
answered Separate Action from Assertion in Unit Tests
May
8
comment How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
@gnat: what do you mean by "In Java for example, initialization of (non-final) field in constructor is not protected from data race". Unless you do something spectacularly complex involving multiple threads, the chances of race conditions inside a constructor are (or should be) near impossible. You can not access a field of an unconstructed object except from within the object constructor. And if the construction fails, you do not have a reference to the object.
May
8
answered How do languages with Maybe types instead of nulls handle edge conditions?
Jan
8
comment At what point is version control needed?
This does not actually answer the OP's question, only addresses differences between their way of doing version control and the conventional way...
Jul
26
awarded  Citizen Patrol
May
24
awarded  Commentator
May
24
comment Is inconsistent formatting a sign of a sloppy programmer?
+1 for "Other developers are users of your code"