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Jul
26
comment Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer
Well firstly, "hardcore" is a pretty loaded term if intended to denote "someone conversant with basic concepts in oo/procedural/functional programming". Secondly, I can't speak for MATLAB, but R has all of these things. The only difference is that in R you are encouraged by the language to couch your problem in such a way that the elements of statistical vocabulary become your primitives. The reason for this is that statisticians and machine learning folks often work with problems easily expressed this way, which makes R a natural fit even if you're comfortable with "harder core" stuff.
Jul
26
comment Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer
@dsimcha, The overhead of calling Numpy is practically a constant. In the performance study I mentioned, you're gaining a few tenths of a second with C++. That time must be compared to time spent writing and debugging, and debugging BLAS calls at that. It might be instructive to ask why not write everything in assembly? Or even straight machine code, since the conversion from assembly to machine code adds some fixed overhead?
Jul
26
comment Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer
You still haven't clarified what a "hardcore programmer" is. By your examples, "hardcore" sounds like it just means "most comfortable with C++", in which case R and MATLAB will not be hardcore by definition. Almost all of your examples reduce to complaints that these languages are not what you are used to, without asking why experts in these fields have seen fit to implement them that way.
Jul
26
comment Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer
"...it seems like these languages were designed by people who aren't hardcore programmers and don't think like hardcore programmers."
Jul
24
comment Surviving MATLAB and R as a Hardcore Programmer
@dsimcha, this is factually incorrect. In this performance study, Numpy is on a par with MATLAB, and Pyrex is well within a factor of 2 of C++.
Jan
30
comment How long would it take to learn Python?
FYI they weren't all guys, but good luck.