36,509 reputation
13122165
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Budapest, Hungary
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Mar 28 at 12:33

Started programming around 1983 on ABC-80 and C-64. Have been a professional developer since 1995 (with some breaks), using mainly Java and C++. Currently working on legacy C# / SQL / Java Enterprise projects. A fan of agile methods and refactoring, and an addict of unit tests since about 2000. Keenly interested in software development methods and process improvement. In the past few years fell in love with functional programming and started to explore Scala. Just recently became Certified ScrumMaster.

In personal life, I used to practice various art forms like music and photography, study psychology and Eastern philosophies, practice and teach Ashtanga Yoga. Nowadays I spend most of my private time playing with and cooking for my wife and two daughters.


Mar
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
20
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
17
comment When do you rebuild an application or keep on fixing the existing one
@WarrenP, fully agreed, that's basically the point I was trying to make above :-)
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Dec
28
comment Is dependency injection essential for unit testing?
@huggie, why would implementation details get leaked here? The dependency injected is typically hidden behind an interface, and the whole point is that the client class has no idea of - and is not concerned with - whether the actual implementation of this dependency is a real production class or a mock. Its instantiation happens outside the client class, it only gets to see the ready-made instance.
Dec
10
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
19
awarded  Guru
Sep
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
12
awarded  Guru
Sep
6
comment One-line functions that are called only once
@dallin, Bob Martin's Clean Code shows lots of semi-real life code examples. If you have too many functions in a single class, maybe your class is too big?
Sep
4
comment One-line functions that are called only once
@dallin, the above is a simplistic example. In real life, your method may contain multiple, or even lots of such chunks of code instead of a single one. Then you start to see the benefit in readability and maintainability (even if none of these chunks are needed anywhere else in your codebase - which is rarely the case in real life). Plus what you won't immediately see is that a series of short method calls is much easier to JIT optimize than one long method.
Aug
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
1
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
7
awarded  Nice Answer
May
15
awarded  Enlightened
May
15
awarded  Nice Answer
May
10
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
16
awarded  Enlightened