36,509 reputation
13122165
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Budapest, Hungary
age 43
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Mar 28 at 12:33

Started programming around 1983 on ABC-80 and C-64. Have been a professional developer since 1995 (with some breaks), using mainly Java and C++. Currently working on legacy C# / SQL / Java Enterprise projects. A fan of agile methods and refactoring, and an addict of unit tests since about 2000. Keenly interested in software development methods and process improvement. In the past few years fell in love with functional programming and started to explore Scala. Just recently became Certified ScrumMaster.

In personal life, I used to practice various art forms like music and photography, study psychology and Eastern philosophies, practice and teach Ashtanga Yoga. Nowadays I spend most of my private time playing with and cooking for my wife and two daughters.


Feb
17
comment When do you rebuild an application or keep on fixing the existing one
@WarrenP, fully agreed, that's basically the point I was trying to make above :-)
Dec
28
comment Is dependency injection essential for unit testing?
@huggie, why would implementation details get leaked here? The dependency injected is typically hidden behind an interface, and the whole point is that the client class has no idea of - and is not concerned with - whether the actual implementation of this dependency is a real production class or a mock. Its instantiation happens outside the client class, it only gets to see the ready-made instance.
Sep
6
comment One-line functions that are called only once
@dallin, Bob Martin's Clean Code shows lots of semi-real life code examples. If you have too many functions in a single class, maybe your class is too big?
Sep
4
comment One-line functions that are called only once
@dallin, the above is a simplistic example. In real life, your method may contain multiple, or even lots of such chunks of code instead of a single one. Then you start to see the benefit in readability and maintainability (even if none of these chunks are needed anywhere else in your codebase - which is rarely the case in real life). Plus what you won't immediately see is that a series of short method calls is much easier to JIT optimize than one long method.
Jan
4
comment What does the latest “C++ Renaissance” mean?
@JonHarrop, you are mis-reading my comment :-) My point is exactly that Google Trends showing a shrinking "trend" for most programming languages does not prove anything about the real use of any of these languages - C++ included.
Nov
12
comment Why prefer a wildcard to a type discriminator in a Java API (Re: Effective Java)
@AndresF. of course it is a small difference if you look at a single method once. Hopwever public APIs may contain dozens of similar methods, and may be read by thousands of developers over and over in the long run. Those lots of tiny savings can add up to significant amounts.
Nov
12
comment Why prefer a wildcard to a type discriminator in a Java API (Re: Effective Java)
@Will, prior to calling, you (usually) read the API declaration. The wildcard version of the declaration is (marginally) simpler for our brains to interpret.
Oct
19
comment Why did the ISO 8601 committee choose Monday as the first day of the week?
@detly, the calendar (including the week) was invented way before books ;-)
Oct
18
comment Is it a bug or a task when something doesn't work, yet, in development process
@jk., I think there is a clear difference between bugs and features, which is meaningful and useful for both customers and developers. Calling everything a bug may demoralize developers in the long run (who likes to work on a product full of bugs?), and turn away customers (who would buy a product full of bugs?), while I can't see any benefit of it.
Oct
15
comment Are long methods always bad?
@AvnerShahar-Kashtan, he probably means "duplication" :-)
Oct
15
comment Given a project and working with 1 other person - never worked with someone before
If they can do it well. However, IMHO pair programming is not always trivial to pick up for inexperienced persons via trial-and-error. Such an attempt can easily turn into something completely different, without the participants even noticing. In fact, it sounds like the OP may have already had a bad experience with it.
Oct
12
comment Is Perforce as good at merging as DVCSs?
I must say my experiences (regarding Perforce being good at merging) are the opposite. I saw Perforce completely screw up complex merges several times, while have had less trouble with Subversion. Of course, the experiences come from totally different projects so they aren't directly comparable. This is just my subjective memory.
Oct
12
comment How important are unit tests in software development?
Acceptance criteria exist on a much higher level than unit tests, so usually they can't directly be tested this way. Unit tests test a small part of the code in isolation, while acceptance criteria refer to the whole system.
Oct
11
comment Hiring Developers - Any tips on being more efficient?
@jgauffin, indeed, top developers do spend some spare time on self education - which may or may not include personal software projects. (Or if it does, these may also be simply for learning purposes, not producing any code worth showing to anyone.)
Oct
11
comment Hiring Developers - Any tips on being more efficient?
@jfrankcarr, yes, unfortunately it is all too common :-((( And it takes some experience to realize this and to learn to choose one's workplace wisely. I can't decide from this little info if tylerl's company is really one of these - it can be a great workplace as well. I almost went to work at a similar place a few years ago (even though I don't write OSS in my spare time ;-), because in most respects it was way above average.
Oct
11
comment Hiring Developers - Any tips on being more efficient?
@tylerl, IMHO your analogy is mistaken. Painting is obviously needed in most houses whereas programming is not (as yet :-). And you are also mistaken when equating "does not write software in his/her spare time" with "only works for money".
Oct
11
comment Hiring Developers - Any tips on being more efficient?
Two notes: 1) this way you just make sure to miss a lot of otherwise equally fit candidates who don't do open-source projects in their spare time, for whatever reason (e.g. they have no spare time, being a father/mother; they prefer keeping a work/life balance to avoid burnout; they have other hobbies; etc.) 2) this doesn't answer the question.
Oct
9
comment Why has extreme programming (XP) gone out of date in favor of Agile, Kanban etc?
As @refro too mentioned, Scrum and Kanban don't include pair programming or code reviews (but neither do they exclude these). Both are more of a project management methodology than a software development process. And as such, they are applicable to a wide range of fields outside software development. Whereas XP is specifically a software development approach. These can coexist - you can manage your XP team in the Scrum way.
Oct
6
comment Constraints while designing the Java generics
@dasblinkenlight, forward compatibility of the (old) JVM doesn't work without backward compatibility of the (new) compiler.
Oct
6
comment Constraints while designing the Java generics
@PeterTaylor, agreed, there are specific use cases where you still need arrays. I believe though that "favour generic collections over arrays" is a perfect rule of thumb 99% of the time.