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Moderator♦ pro tempore on French Language, Computer Science and Software Recommendations. I'm also a unix amateur, and a developer with a computer science background and security leanings by trade.

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Avatar picture slightly adapted from a photo by Luridiformis (Zonda Grattus).


Dec
18
revised How common are use SDLC methodologies in real life?
attempt to focus the question a bit and tone down the poll-y aspect
Dec
17
suggested approved edit on How common are use SDLC methodologies in real life?
Dec
17
comment How common are use SDLC methodologies in real life?
This is a question for programmers, not for computer scientists, so I'm migrating it to a site where the audience is programmers.
Oct
31
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
6
awarded  Informed
Sep
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
20
comment Is hashing of just “username + password” as safe as salted hashing
@randomA The second problem is very much a problem! The problem is not, as you seem to have read, that hashing is too slow, but that it is too fast. Hashing must be slow by construction, so that brute force attacks take a long time. If part of the computation can be done in advance, that is a bad thing.
Aug
19
answered Is hashing of just “username + password” as safe as salted hashing
Aug
19
comment Is hashing of just “username + password” as safe as salted hashing
The conclusion is correct, but the details aren't quite right. The function of the salt is not entropy, but uniqueness — enough entropy does achieve uniqueness, which is why generating a random salt (the usual method) is a fine choice. The attacker knows the salt if they know the hash, that's not an issue. The third point is important and is why the salt needs to be unique and so can't be derived from password and username alone.
Aug
19
comment Is hashing of just “username + password” as safe as salted hashing
Everything you ever wanted to know on how to hash passwords.
Aug
19
comment Is hashing of just “username + password” as safe as salted hashing
Or Information Security. And the answer is a resounding no. (Less resounding if you include the user name, but still bad: the salt needs to be unique.)
Mar
16
answered Why do most sites require email activation
Mar
6
revised Design pattern for bidirectional signals/events
title; tags; formatting
Mar
5
suggested approved edit on Design pattern for bidirectional signals/events
Mar
5
comment Design pattern for bidirectional signals/events
I'm not sure I fully agree that this question is off-topic, but given that you're using engineer jargon that computer scientists tend not to use, I think this question would be better off in an engineering venue than here in a computer science venue. So I'm migrating this question to where I think it'll be better received. It would help if you said what language you're programming in.
Jan
28
comment Is it a bad idea to return different data types from a single function in a dynamically typed language?
“Returning different types” means “returning objects with different APIs”. (Some languages make the way the object is constructed a fundamental part of the API, some don't; that's a matter of how expressive the type system is.) In your list/file example, do_file returns an iterable of strings either way.
Jan
10
comment What is meant by “Now you have two problems”?
@MichaelHampton twoproblems.com/50
Dec
27
comment Why not annotate function parameters?
@KChaloux In OCaml, there are already type annotations in the interface (.mli) file (if you write one, which you are strongly encouraged to. Type annotations tend to be omitted from definitions because they'd be redundant with the interface.
Dec
17
comment Why do dynamic languages make it more difficult to maintain large codebases?
“all type errors you encounter when working on the program would correspond to a runtime failure”: this isn't true (which is a big argument of dynamic typing proponents). However, if there would be no runtime failure, this is for a nonobvious reason that needs to be documented. Rather than document in the form of a comment, you might as well document it in a way the compiler understands and checks. I would say that all type errors you encounter when working on the program would correspond to a runtime failure or maintenance nightmare.
Oct
17
comment Rails: Law of Demeter Confusion
Please do not post the same question on multiple sites.