853 reputation
46
bio website musigenesis.com
location Philadelphia, PA
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Jan 28 '12 at 12:39

Recovering anthropologist, professional (as in "I get paid", not "I am better than all others") programmer since 19-ought-95. In my last job, despite my vigorous protests, I was given the actual title of "visionary". I will be trying to live this down for the rest of my life.

I do C#, software synthesis, animation, windows mobile and other stuff. The other stuff now includes: iPhone/iPad (Objective-C), Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone 7.

If you live in Philly and play disc golf, we may know each other already.


Jan
26
awarded  Yearling
Jan
26
awarded  Yearling
Mar
3
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
28
answered A colourblind member of our team
Jan
28
awarded  Supporter
Jan
26
awarded  Yearling
May
2
answered Company sends debug versions of software to clients
Feb
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
16
awarded  Commentator
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
awarded  Teacher
Jan
22
answered Do Microsoft Certifications matter?
Sep
7
comment What issues carry the highest risk in a software project?
@David: I guess by "good" software I meant software that satisfies the business requirements the project was started to satisfy, which would include comprehensiveness. For any project that by its nature requires the coordination of large numbers of programmers, the principle (only?) point of failure would of course be management. So, despite our different work experiences, I think we'd agree that it's definitely somebody else's fault. :)
Sep
7
comment What issues carry the highest risk in a software project?
@David: I respect and agree with all your points except the last sentence, which I don't think I understand. Are you saying that large projects generally focus on producing bad, unreliable software? I have worked on both small projects (as a one-man team) and large multi-developer projects. In my experience, many large projects are just small projects that were allowed to grow out of control, which is of course the fault of management. However, a programmer that can identify the inner small project and produce it will end up with a happy customer despite management's best efforts to fail.
Sep
3
comment What issues carry the highest risk in a software project?
@David: or maybe you've worked with worse people. I've worked in plenty of situations as a programmer under technically incompetent management and still produced good, reliable software (by effectively ignoring said managers). I've never seen management ruin a project except by assigning inexperienced/incapable programmers.
Sep
27
comment Math questions at a programmer interview?
My candidate interviews are programming tests. Maybe the study you're referring to was about interviews for non-programming jobs? That I could believe.
Sep
15
comment Prevent Casual Piracy for Simple Utility
@Chad: why can't someone send a friend the app and the license key?
Sep
15
comment Prevent Casual Piracy for Simple Utility
@silky: Really? You think ninja beats pirate? Maybe at night, and on land.
Sep
15
comment Prevent Casual Piracy for Simple Utility
@Rex: it's worth my time (at $20 a pop) for sure. Makes me feel wanted. :)