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seen Nov 7 at 16:59

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awarded  Notable Question
Apr
25
answered Why do C# developers newline opening brackets?
Oct
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awarded  Popular Question
Sep
5
revised I'm going to quit my job because of our platform: how can I leave a productive explanation of this?
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awarded  Yearling
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30
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
27
revised Plagued by indecision - how to choose technologies to use for projects?
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Apr
25
comment Should my async task library swallow exceptions quietly?
But you do get a normal exception for op1, right? If that one remains unhandled, it will bring down the process, right?
Apr
12
awarded  Guru
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11
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
22
comment How bad would it be to obtain a lock on every object?
Sorry for deleting and then reposting this; I didn't really mean to delete it. StackExchange might do well with an undelete button...
Feb
22
asked How bad would it be to obtain a lock on every object?
Jan
15
revised Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
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Jan
15
revised Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
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Jan
14
comment Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
@gnat: Try set Accumulator32 to BaseIndex32? Simply expanding the traditional abbreviations is not the only way to make something more readable.
Jan
14
comment Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
@SK-logic: ① “it will be nearly 8 times slower if the source stream is 8 times more verbose” — poppycock. Have you measured it? ② “assembly is usually produced by a compiler backend and consumed by the assembler” — also poppycock. That was the case in the 1980s and is only maintained in antiquated rubbish like gcc. Any proper modern compiler simply spits out a binary and there is none of that nonsense.
Jan
14
comment Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
If it’s an intermediate representation, then overhead is irrelevant nowadays, unless you have been in cryostasis since 1980. The final representation — the one that is actually distributed to all users — is in a compact binary format. As for readability, people who find such a short and cryptic representation to be more readable than normal English words seem to me to be elitists who (subconsciously, perhaps) want to exclude the “noobs” from their noble profession. You must memorize these abbrevs or you can’t be one of us!
Jan
14
revised Why are cryptic short identifiers still so common in low-level programming?
added 1 characters in body
Dec
16
asked Is the separation of program logic and presentation layer going too far?