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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Jan 17 at 13:39

Oct
15
comment Why do people say that VB gives you bad programming habits?
@CharlesAddis To me, the point of tutorials is to figure out the basics; to get you started. This is especially true if you are new to programming or a new to a certain paradigm. BTW, my favorite mug has the letters RTFM on them.
Sep
12
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
@kevin Agreed. I assumed that most wrappers are relatively simple. If they are not, one should have enough sense to take that into consideration.
Sep
12
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
@Lie One can simply update the wrapper and slowly begin to use the new functionality. The idea being that the existing functionality will still work and you are not forced to make changes to the code using it.
Sep
12
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
@kevin That is more work, and thus carries more risk, than simply updating the wrapper and running the tests.
Sep
12
comment Why most of large corporations websites are bad?
@anna Maybe you'd be guessing, but I see some solid principles which apply here and would be useful for programmers to keep in mind before they jump to criticize a business.
Sep
11
comment Why most of large corporations websites are bad?
+1 result of an average of efforts going in different directions
Sep
11
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
@lotsoffreetime That is a difficult question to answer. I've expanded on my answer to that end. (Basically, it's down to a lot of ifs.)
Sep
11
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
I don't think that YAGNI necessarily applies in this situation. It isn't about building in functionality in case you may need it in the future. It is about building flexibility into the architecture. If that flexibility is unnecessary, then, yes, YAGNI applies. However, that determination tends to be made sometime in the future when making the change will likely be painful.
Sep
11
comment Using third-party libraries - always use a wrapper?
@lotsoffreetime You can't avoid some coupling to an API. Therefore, it's better to couple to your own API. That way, you can change out the library and generally not need to change the API provided by the wrapper.
Sep
9
comment Saying “no” to people asking questions
@mehaase You completely missed the point. 1) If I'm the position to have discovered something, than I'm probably not looking in the wiki for that information. 2) More importantly, if there isn't support for the wiki from management then one would have to spend their free time to update the wiki. That can work, if there is enough downtime. 3) Most importantly, Moose mentioned in the question that documentation already exists, but many times it's just easier to ask than to search for the information.
Sep
9
comment Saying “no” to people asking questions
Only if it is maintained. Take it from someone that had to make use of a wiki which was woefully out of date. You follow directions on how to setup your dev environment, only to find out that several steps are missing, several steps are just plain wrong and several steps don't actually apply to a dev environment.
Sep
9
comment Saying “no” to people asking questions
don't say no Or, at least, don't say no directly. :)
Sep
9
comment Saying “no” to people asking questions
-1 Stuff does get documented, but it is often easier to ask a "quick question" A wiki is no silver bullet. If the culture is correct for it, i.e. the wiki is actually maintained, then it certainly can be useful. Otherwise, it can actually be worse. (Incorrect documentation is worse than no documentation.)
Jul
26
comment How can I tell in an interview if a programmer is passionate about programming?
@mattimus A fair point. Note that it isn't an exact science. After an answer like yours, I would ask: Why do computers interest you? What is it about them that interests you? Also, I would be paying attention to how the questions are answered, not just what words are used to answer them. That's one reason that I highlighted the phrase engage their passion.
Jul
25
comment How can I tell in an interview if a programmer is passionate about programming?
+1 engage their passion Especially by asking them what got them interested in programming. I believe that any passionate programmer will go on at length about this topic.
Jun
18
comment Is java a good start to learn OOP?
I took an OOP class in college, because I wanted to learn C++. They taught me Java. :)
May
3
comment Seeking LOC counter with estmated cost to write those LOCs
I need ... something, anything ... to show that s/w development is not free. I suggest that you try asking this question as well. (In another post, of course.) In other words, look at what you're trying to achieve and ask for suggestions on how that may be achieved.
Apr
2
comment How do you feel about being asked to code during an interview?
@Mystere One approach that I like, but isn't necessarily viable for every company, is having two separate interviews. The initial interview judges personality and cultural fit. (BTW, this is not the HR interview we all love so much.) The technical interview then deals with coding/problem-solving ability.
Apr
2
comment What would you do if a senior level programmer stole your code?
+1 One note though: lead != senior. Part of a lead's job is to delegate some tasks to the team. That said, stealing credit for the actual work is not.
Apr
2
comment My experiences are server side programming and database management, I want to learn C++, where do I start?
+1 Especially for actively reading a book. (On that note, I can't help but recommend How to Read a Book.)