977 reputation
711
bio website berry120.blogspot.com
location United Kingdom
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 14 hours ago

I'm an avid programmer, enjoy creating things, enjoy a good puzzle and especially enjoy foxing people with a Java puzzle now and again!

Outside of my coding life, I have a number of other interests, including outdoors activities such as hiking / geocaching / letterboxing. I'm also fond of music - I enjoy listening to it as well as playing the piano and violin.


Jun
11
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Feb
5
awarded  Guru
Feb
4
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
3
comment Why is it hard to make a Java program 'appear native'?
@SnakeDoc It appears more modern, sure, but I wouldn't say it appears "native" - it certainly doesn't use the platform's underlying GUI components, it's all skinned in CSS.
Feb
3
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
3
awarded  Mortarboard
Feb
3
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
comment Why is it hard to make a Java program 'appear native'?
@user3150201 Sure, so the underlying OS will have a set amount of buttons and widgets that can be placed natively, but obviously these buttons will differ between OS and between platforms - these are the heavyweight, native components. Lightweight components aren't the components dictated by the OS, they're drawn by Java (in this case) to look and behave like GUI components - so they can look however you want if you put the work in (but you have to emulate the platform look and feel if you want that, you don't get it for free.)
Feb
3
answered Why is it hard to make a Java program 'appear native'?
Feb
3
comment Fixing a security exploit - but then everyone knows about it
@Xandaros The smartness would come in terms of seeing if you could manipulate what's already in the program to somehow give your users a warning about the hole at least - are there any server side requests to your end that you could manipulate for instance? Of course, the answer may well be no, but it's worth thinking about. If not, then just treat it as a learning curve as to why it's important to put these alert mechanisms in place at the earliest opportunity!
Feb
3
comment Fixing a security exploit - but then everyone knows about it
@Xandaros Bugs and security holes are discovered in software all the time - that's life. As I've said already, I'd seriously consider writing some logic to ensure that in future you can notify users appropriately to avoid this in future - but in short, you should never feel bad about fixing an issue, especially a big one such as this! Leaving it untouched is another matter entirely though...
Feb
3
answered Fixing a security exploit - but then everyone knows about it
Feb
3
answered Is it okay to make coding style changes on an open source project that doesn't follow best practices?
Feb
26
awarded  Constituent
Feb
18
awarded  Caucus
Jan
30
awarded  Yearling
Jan
30
awarded  Yearling
Oct
10
answered Java certification - Should I upgrade?
Apr
21
awarded  Nice Answer