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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jun 15 at 6:18

Nov
19
comment Is Java (still) the cross platform language of choice?
Good answer. Of course, making sure your app works right in all the various browser versions can be a headache as well.
Nov
18
comment Whats the greatest most impressive programing feat you ever witnessed?
Ms. Pac-Man was far superior
Nov
16
comment Should I tell the interviewer I already know the answer to the question being asked?
Yeah, I think this is fair. It's not like knowing the answers is cheating; if anything, it's a sign of experience. I mean, don't fake it, like pretending you just invented quicksort on the spot without ever having heard of it or something (bad example because everyone's heard of quicksort, but you know what I mean). Just answer immediately. It will probably be obvious you were familiar with the problem, but there's no need to say so explicitly, and if anything that could be taken as criticizing the interviewer for picking an unoriginal problem.
Nov
16
comment Should I tell the interviewer I already know the answer to the question being asked?
@Pavel: Sure but you could ask them "What was the advantage of doing it this way instead of that way?" That way you can see if they really understand the thought process behind the answer, or if they just memorized the answer without understanding why.
Nov
5
comment async & await - poll for alternatives
I like resume after for await. Maybe async could be called resumable.
Nov
5
comment async & await - poll for alternatives
Is a new keyword necessarily a bad thing? As I understand it, the await keyword would be recognized by context, so you could still have a method or variable named "await" if you wanted to. To some degree, I think using a new keyword for new functionality is less confusing than reusing an existing keyword to mean more than one thing. (exaggerated example: dangermouse.net/esoteric/ook.html)
Nov
4
comment Whiteboard “testing” during an interview: legitimate way to back up your (whiteboard) code?
I'm a big fan of whiteboard coding in interviews, but anyone who's expecting your whiteboard code to be syntactically perfect is doing it wrong. The point is to see how you attack a problem, not to see that you can produce syntactically perfect code in a totally unrealistic environment.
Nov
4
comment How do programmers quit a job?
The paragraph starting "the last two" stopped making sense when you edited and removed the last two. Could use another edit, perhaps?
Nov
4
comment Why do .Net books talk about stack vs heap memory allocation?
Jeremy, the difference between heap and stack allocation can't explain the different behavior between value types and reference types, because there are times when both value types and reference types are on the heap, and yet they behave differently. The more important thing to understand is (for instance) when you need to use pass-by-reference for reference types vs value types. This just depends on "is it a value type or reference type", not "is it on the heap".
Nov
4
answered What are some conventions that are often mistaken for language features?
Nov
3
comment Ideal programming language learning sequence?
You know, I do think there's some value of learning a new language even if you don't need it ... however I agree with the general sentiment that it's often better to learn a language because you think you'd find it useful rather because it's what you think you "should" learn.
Nov
2
comment What are use cases and advantages of pointers?
@SnOrfus: Beat me to it. I went to look up the URL and got sidetracked re-reading the article :)
Nov
2
comment What are use cases and advantages of pointers?
@zvrba: At least in C#, pointers and references are not the same thing. Eric Lippert discusses the difference here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/02/17/…
Oct
27
awarded  Good Question
Oct
27
comment If you were the manager of a team of 25 developers, how would you motivate them?
In particular, some people do better work with frequent short breaks, and how they spend those breaks should be up to them. As long as you're happy with their productivity, there's no need to micromanage.
Oct
27
comment If you were the manager of a team of 25 developers, how would you motivate them?
@aggietech: I disagree on blocking sites, for pretty much all the reasons given in this thread: programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/13676/…
Oct
26
comment What would you change about C# if you could?
@Timwi: I can't say I really understand it either, although I suspect Eric Lippert's claims about the C# compiler are true whether or not I understand them.
Oct
26
comment Biggest mistake you've ever made
@Dean: It wasn't the biggest mistake I've ever made... I was just clarifying the difference in behavior here with C# vs Java
Oct
26
comment Biggest mistake you've ever made
This is much more of a problem in Java, where == is a reference comparison. In C#, == does a value comparison on strings, same as .Equals() That said, there are some differences, see Jon Skeet's answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3678792/…
Oct
25
comment What would you change about C# if you could?
Reading Eric Lippert's blog post linked above, iterator blocks are implemented in a way that assumes iterators can't be contained in anonymous methods. Eric specifically says that if they did away with this restriction they'd have to write a new pass that handles nested iterators and anonymous methods simultaneously. So it doesn't seem the two algorithms they currently use can "trivially work in serial" as you suggest.