8,448 reputation
42445
bio website google.com/…
location Berlin, Germany
age
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 16 at 11:30

Oct
4
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
13
awarded  Yearling
Jul
18
comment Consistency of an object
@supercat: "Quasi-classes are perfectly fine in cases where what is needed is simply to have a means of collectively identifying a bunch of independent-but-related variables." You're referring to what a struct is in C. Yeah, that's fine, but not what the article refers to. (Have you considered reading it?)
Jul
1
revised Benefits of porting C library to C++
edited body
May
30
answered Benefits of porting C library to C++
May
22
comment Where did the notion of “one return only” come from?
@Mehrdad: I have answered to this years ago.
May
22
comment Where did the notion of “one return only” come from?
@Mehrdad: 1. Write good, easy to understand, well maintainable code. 2. Fix the bugs. 3. Test whether it's fast enough. 3a. If it is, your done. 3b. If it isn't, profile and measure to find the (few) hotspots, and sacrify readability there. Only there.
May
7
comment When to use C over C++, and C++ over C?
@Dan: What's the difference to my third bullet?
Apr
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
27
revised Is declaring STL variables in a class definition too revealing?
added 51 characters in body
Mar
26
answered Is declaring STL variables in a class definition too revealing?
Mar
6
revised Why didn't the C++ Standard adopt expression templates?
edited body
Jan
31
comment Where did the notion of “one return only” come from?
@Piovezan: "I can't see how introducing a local variable to be returned at the function's end necessarily leads to manipulating control flow through it." This is such a common case that I never thought I would need to show code doing that. Think a C algorithm, where all functions invoked return an error status. That is stored in a variable err, and if one function returns an error, all the others must not be called anymore. As for the rest: I won't even attempt to reply to that.
Sep
13
awarded  Yearling
Aug
17
revised In C++, were SFINAE and metaprogramming intentional or just a byproduct of templates?
added 5 characters in body
May
14
awarded  Great Answer
Apr
4
awarded  Great Answer
Mar
25
comment Should I expect my team to have more than a basic proficiency with our source control system?
@Joshua: That said, given your cow-worker's situation, I'd probably have demanded a git book long since and read enough in it to do the basic tasks for my everyday work. Let's not forget, though, that git is a monster to wrestle down.
Mar
25
comment Should I expect my team to have more than a basic proficiency with our source control system?
I have more kids than some here had girlfriends, and I do read technical books. However, I also have a big household to manage, two ex-wifes to haggle with, a garden to tend to, an ever-growing stack of non-technical books to read, and lots of other stuff, some fun to do and some not. So I either have to be intrigued by a technical book or I have to need the information it offers very badly in order to spend my precious reading time (mostly 120mins of commuting) with it, rather than with a good novel. And over the years I have learned that most devs are a lot less eager to keep up learning.
Mar
7
comment Is the C programming language still used?
"You may need to use C when you are low on resources and don't need object oriented capabilities." What if I need generic programming capabilities? Functional ones? C++ is a multi-paradigm language. It shines brightest and is most powerful when paradigms are elegantly combined. (Note: std::vector<std::shared_ptr<my_base>> does just that.)