477 reputation
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location London, United Kingdom
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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jun 13 '12 at 8:57

Sep
2
awarded  Yearling
May
13
awarded  Scholar
May
13
accepted Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
May
13
comment Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
While I was looking to gain insight from others' experiences, ultimately, this is the right answer.
May
12
comment Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
@gnat - The two team approach isn't the right solution for our situation, but I think the answer lies in what you said about "be open to experimenting". I was very interested in hearing about other people's experiences with this issue to find the best solution, but ultimately we've been experimenting with a couple different approaches to find what works best. If you make this an answer, I'll mark it as accepted.
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
20
comment Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
Ultimately we'll end up using English. Perhaps the answer is more around providing support for members of the team to improve their English?
Apr
20
comment Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
The headquarters of the company moved from one country to another, so the dominant language of the company is shifting from one to another, but there is no 'official' language. My focus is on enabling communication rather than forcing a language.
Apr
20
awarded  Critic
Apr
20
comment Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
I've clarified the question a bit. The central issue is language rather than geography.
Apr
20
revised Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
clarify central issue is language, not geography
Apr
19
awarded  Commentator
Apr
19
asked Scrum for team split between two spoken languages
Mar
9
asked Pattern for group of entities with one required primary member
Nov
8
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
3
awarded  Yearling
Aug
21
comment What is the benefit of not using Hungarian notation?
Variable names with hungarian notation are typically difficult to pronounce alphabet soup which inhibits readability and discussing code because you can't 'say' any of the names.
Aug
6
comment Responding to interview questions involving unknown algorithms
I think it all depends on how the question is presented. If it is simply 'implement this algorithm' and the interviewer is looking for a regurgitated answer, then it is pointless. I prefer leading into the coding exercise after some general discussion of data structures and algorithms at which point I have a good idea of their knowledge and the candidate should have some idea of how to approach the problem from our discussion. I want to see how he can apply it, think through the problem and code it up.
Aug
6
comment Responding to interview questions involving unknown algorithms
Agreed. When asking a programming/algorithm question in an interview, I actually don't want the candidate doesn't 'know' the answer and simply recite it. I want to see how they think, approach the problem and what the code looks like in the end.
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer