101 reputation
2
bio website
location San Francisco, CA
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Nov 30 '11 at 7:10

Software developer. Designer. 3D hobby-artist. Interested in computational behavior and generative art.


Jan
4
comment How important is my job title?
@SnOrfus Heh, well, in cases where there are no real rules and the area is gray such as this, forthrightness and prudence should reign. It can get down to arguing semantics but I'd say that if you had authority and autonomy over a budget, purchasing decisions, or primary technology choices, you have every right to state and contend that you were a "director". Again, no actual rule here, but IMO a C-level title gives the impression that you reported to a board of directors or were atop a large hierarchy... so maybe pushing it on that one.
Jan
4
comment How important is my job title?
@SnOrfus Yes, I'm serious. And, no one said anything about misrepresenting oneself. Downright lying about your qualifications can be prosecuted as fraud in some jurisdictions and is certainly grounds for dismissal anywhere else. That said, you don't have to present yourself as "Purple Widget Engineer II" because your employer GoneTomorrow Inc. had you listed as such when you were really a project manager. It's worth noting that a résumé is not a legal document, however an application, if you fill one out and sign it, is.
Jan
3
comment I still can't figure out how to program?
The Norvig post is a great synopsis of the need for deliberate effortful study. I absolutely agree with it but IMO a few specific things are missing. As a beginner, two things created the turning point where I got it. 1) I had a really great OOA/D prof. from SUN. As a beginner, OOP is a great way to start thinking about the composition of software (many come later of course). 2) Explore/cultivate interests in other domains. One'll likely find cool problems to solve with software which can be the motivation one needs. E.g. AI, biology/genetics, chemistry, robotics, games, sport stats, etc.
Jan
3
comment How important is my job title?
It's the truth. As long as it is not a protected term, the titles on your résumé or CV are your choice based on the role you performed, not what the employer called it. Both résumés and CVs are about your qualifications, not what someone else named you internally. If you're honestly worried about employment verification, you can reference the internal title somewhere in the descriptive body of text for that particular job.
Sep
24
awarded  Teacher
Sep
14
comment Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
Umm... interesting that you quote Spolsky's article on it, as it's more to the point, "The dark side took over Hungarian Notation." It's all about "Apps Hungarian" being twisted into "Systems Hungarian" because people make an incorrect inference about what Simonyi meant when he said "type". It's to see wrongness when you are assigning a "colX" to a "rowY", not so that you can keep track of the fact that something is a long integer as opposed to a short. Also, I specifically call out only variables. I foresee a -1 from swaths embedded devs still using vi and C++ devs as it's "just the way".
Sep
13
answered Does keeping a journal help in your job?
Sep
13
comment Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
+1 to rally against the belief that every class someone writes might some day be part of an far-reaching public API of global importance and therefore needs a rigid interface separate to its implementation... as if it's destined for the IETF or something. Most of time I see "Impl", it makes my blood pressure go up because this tells me you didn't write the interface to specify class compliance (good), you did it to because "everything is a framework" (bad+wrong).
Sep
13
answered Worst coding standard you've ever had to follow?
Sep
13
comment Job hopping, is it a problem?
Furthermore, many start-ups that don't implode tend to have distinct shifts in effort. At first there's lots of new code, creativity, innovation, and soft business plans, then there is often a lot of maintenance, scaling, and fine-tuning. These tend to not be the same types of employees.
Sep
13
awarded  Supporter
Sep
13
comment Job hopping, is it a problem?
@SnOrfus The assumption here is that people only look for new jobs because they were unable to keep the previous one. This is false and particularly so for high-powered programmers who find themselves at any of the myriad start-ups that turn out to either have terrible work environments or be on a death march. This is definitely the norm in Silicon Valley... and presumably in all other incubator areas.