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location Argentina
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 9 mins ago

Software developer and science fiction fan.


Oct
20
comment Why isn't Java used for modern web application development?
@Bozho They used an artificial language called Purity for that study. Allow me to doubt their results :)
Oct
17
comment Why are some data types Deprecated while others Obsolete?
The difference between obsolete/deprecated/whatever depends on the programming language or the framework. Each has its standards. Why not ask them for your particular case?
Oct
17
comment Why are some data types Deprecated while others Obsolete?
What? Which programming language?
Oct
16
comment good literature for teaching object oriented thinking in C
@gnat I was, though I don't code in C anymore. Let me rephrase: I do not doubt the guy knows his stuff, and the article is clever, but C is not an object-oriented language, period. This isn't really debatable, unless you want to argue assembly is OOP, too. "X-oriented language" != "X can be done with it". So my toned-down assertion is: "I can't take this particular assertion seriously".
Oct
16
comment good literature for teaching object oriented thinking in C
I have trouble taking someone who claims ANSI-C is a "full-scale object-oriented language" seriously, as opposed to "a language I can manage to do OOP with".
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
It wasn't clear indeed. The question has now been retagged and reformulated :)
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
@JimmyHoffa I think so. Also see stonemetal's answer
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
My thesis director, who programs exclusively in Haskell, also uses the term "destructor" for an unwrapper.
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
Evidence of usage of the term "destructor" in Haskell communities: haskell.org/pipermail/beginners/2010-April/003946.html and mail-archive.com/haskell-cafe@haskell.org/msg26463.html . A "destructor" in Haskell lingo is an "unwrapper", a concept totally unrelated to memory management or object finalization.
Oct
12
comment Off-shore bug fixing
Sounds like a terrible idea.
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
Fair enough, I removed my downvote. I think what's misguided is the actual question, which seems to be asking one thing, but is actually asking another! :)
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
A destructor in C++-like languages performs cleanup actions before releasing allocated memory. A destructor in Haskell unwraps a value from its "outer layer" (you don't use it to cleanup anything). They aren't truly related concepts.
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
I suggest you remove the word "destructor" from the question, use "unwrapper" instead, and ask whether there is a general name for this pattern across languages :)
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
This seems specialized to Haskell (a "destructor" in Haskell isn't the same concept as in C++. The name similarity is misleading). If you want the general concept of "unwrapping a value", you probably shouldn't use Haskell as an example. In C++-like languages, such an "unwrapper" may be simply a getter!
Oct
12
comment What's the proper term for a function inverse to a constructor - to unwrap a value from a data type?
Note that C++/C#/Java's usage of the term "destructor" doesn't match Haskell's. Same word, different concepts.
Oct
11
comment Why isn't literate programming mainstream?
@MartinBeckett What you describe is not LP.
Oct
11
comment Why isn't literate programming mainstream?
@h0b0 & user1249: The whole article by Knuth is irony, as you can find out just by skim-reading it. He also mocks Steve Jobs, the web, Agile, refactoring, OOP, AOP, and many other things. It's a joke!
Oct
3
comment What functionality does dynamic typing allow?
@Robert I agree with most of your answer. However, note that there are statically-typed languages with interactive read-eval-print loops, such as Scala and Haskell. It may be that C# just isn't a particularly interactive language.
Sep
23
comment How do tight timelines and scheduling pressure affect TCO and delivery time?
My point is that when one is discussing software development, the keywords are "schedule", "deadlines", "budget", "risks", etc. Not TCO :)
Sep
23
comment How do tight timelines and scheduling pressure affect TCO and delivery time?
@ThomasOwens Judging by that link from Wikipedia, that's not the impression I get. Development is definitely not mentioned (do a search!), even though technology and software products are (and related concerns, such as deployment and maintenance). TCO is related to ownership, it even says so in the name! My understanding is that TCO is a consideration when choosing which product to buy, not which product to build.