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Feb
12
comment Does this python program obey functional paradigm?
possible duplicate of How do I enforce 'referential transparency' in this program?
Feb
10
comment How do I enforce 'referential transparency' in this program?
@ziggystar True, but note that the definition (and the question) is about referential transparency for every subexpression. What you describe is referentially transparent from outside, but not from inside (if you use a mutable cache, there are inner subexpressions which you cannot freely replace).
Feb
9
comment What's the point with HATEOAS on the client-side?
Wouldn't this mean that you must build a client as complex (and bug prone) as a browser? Flexibility often comes with complexity as a cost...
Feb
7
awarded  Yearling
Feb
6
comment Relation between object orientation and algorithms
Note that in a possibly imperfect way, declarative languages aim at reducing or eliminating the "how" step. Their goal is for you to simply say "this is what I want" (for example, by writing high level equations). Think of a typical SQL query: very little of it is "algorithmic"; you simply tell the database what you want, and it's up to it how it handles your request (within certain limitations, of course).
Feb
6
comment Relation between object orientation and algorithms
This seems like too broad to me. There are at least 4 separate questions in there. I suggest you focus on only one and remove the rest.
Feb
5
revised In what case a use case should be written
removed irrelevant tag about functional-programming
Feb
4
comment Does it matter how I format the name of a function?
@Den Are you arguing that you shouldn't follow F#'s style conventions when coding in F#? If so, that's terrible advice.
Feb
3
comment What's the benefit of GIT for solo programmer?
I have to side with gnat on this: the OP is confusing git with github, not bothering to look into source control in general and its rationale, displaying unwarranted sarcasm in the question... this sounds like a rant in disguise, and it shows very poor research.
Jan
28
comment Leaving intentional bugs in code for testers to find
+1 It reminded me of that DailyWTF post too!
Jan
27
revised Is the 'finally' portion of a 'try … catch … finally' construct even necessary?
code formatting
Jan
27
reviewed No Action Needed Is factory pattern a right pattern for the situation described here?
Jan
27
reviewed No Action Needed Is factory pattern a right pattern for the situation described here?
Jan
27
reviewed Reviewed Small code, big test
Jan
27
reviewed Approve Is the 'finally' portion of a 'try … catch … finally' construct even necessary?
Jan
26
comment Does functional programming increase the 'representational gap' between problems and solutions?
@Fuhrmanator A customer can still write one-line user stories and business rules regardless of whether you use OOP and FP. I don't expect customers to understand higher-order functions any more than I expect them to understand inheritance, composition or interfaces.
Jan
26
comment Does functional programming increase the 'representational gap' between problems and solutions?
@Doval That's how a Haskeler friend told me to start working on a Haskell function: sprinkling "undefined"s wherever I don't have an implementation yet :) It seems top-down to me.
Jan
26
comment Does functional programming increase the 'representational gap' between problems and solutions?
@Fuhrmanator But you do know where to find a function. And there is only one function, not multiple functions with the same name, defined for each datatype (again, see the "Expression Problem"). For example, for Haskell library functions (which you're encouraged to use, instead of rediscovering the wheel or making a slightly less useful versions of said functions), you have wonderful discovery tools such as Hoogle, which is so powerful it lets you search by signature (try it! :) )
Jan
26
comment Does functional programming increase the 'representational gap' between problems and solutions?
@Den I can't tell what either of those functions do. However, I can tell you if the first function in FP was a sort or a filter, it would be named filter or sort, not func (just like you named it IFilter, etc). In general, in FP you'd name it func or f when either sort or filter is a valid choice! For example, when writing a higher-order function that takes func as a parameter.
Jan
26
comment Does functional programming increase the 'representational gap' between problems and solutions?
@Den The popularity you describe is, I'm afraid, an accident of history. I use Scala at work, and it's a complex beast due to the way it attempts to mix FP and OOP. Switching to a true FP language like Haskell feels like a breath of fresh air -- and I'm not talking from an academic perspective either!