1,479 reputation
178
bio website about.me/scottdorman
location Florida
age 41
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Apr 28 at 14:48

Scott is a C# MVP, author and INETA North America Community Speaker who has been involved with computers in one way or another for as long as he can remember, but started professionally in 1993. He has worked at Fortune 500 companies and privately held start-ups focused on IT consulting where he gained experience in embedded systems design and software development to systems administration and database programming, and everything in between.

After spending 6 years as a systems administrator, Scott started developing eCommerce store fronts. Since 2001, he has worked on many different projects using .NET and C#. Although his primary focus right now is commercial software applications, he prefers building infrastructure components, reusable shared libraries and helping companies define, develop and automate process standards and guidelines.

Scott runs a software architecture-focused user group, speaks extensively, blogs, and contributes regularly to online communities such as The Code Project and StackOverflow, and is the Community Manager and Senior Editor for DotNetKicks. He is also the creator of Windows Phone Marketplace Requests.


Sep
4
revised What is the ideal mix of senior to junior developers on a team?
edited tags
Sep
4
revised What should be the ideal computer science and engineering course topics?
edited tags
Sep
4
awarded  Organizer
Sep
4
revised If you could only have one programming related book on your bookshelf what would it be and why?
edited tags
Sep
4
awarded  Teacher
Sep
4
answered Computer Science: Arts or Science?
Sep
4
answered What's your favourite quote about programming?
Sep
4
answered “Comments are a code smell”
Sep
4
awarded  Supporter
Sep
4
awarded  Autobiographer
Oct
17
answered Is premature optimization really the root of all evil?
Oct
17
comment Is premature optimization really the root of all evil?
I think "gold-plating" is different than optimizations. Optimizations are generally all about trying to get the most performance while "gold-plating" is about adding the "bells and whistles" (all the extra functionality) that isn't critical to the product but looks/feels cool to do.