185 reputation
6
bio website
location Burnaby, Canada
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Nov 18 at 0:06

(my about me is no longer blank)


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
6
comment Programming with a group of people I've never met
I'd disagree with your first two points. Don't expect the worst of people or that's what you'll get. You'll build resentment and may lose support of useful team members if they sense your disdain. Mentoring that kid who's unfamiliar with the language can be great experience and reduce your work load. (But be on the lookout for leeches who refuse to think.) Also, the project has a "team evaluation" so whoever does the work can get credit. (Or whoever made everyone feel like dirt gets nothing.) Be brutally honest and don't worry that the guy who did nothing fails. It's only fair to your team.
Aug
18
comment Looking for unpaid interns (2) - am I crazy?
Side note: The answers on the question Paid Job or Unpaid Job should be helpful to understand what your potential applicants are thinking about your unpaid job. (Being a nonprofit will probably change things a bit in your favour.)
Aug
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
7
comment Fast cold start text editor
If you're a Windows user and new to vim, you might want to try the Cream config for vim. Also, as you get to use vim more, you may want to add some integration with Visual Studio.
Aug
6
comment How do you stop yourself from bringing work home?
@Chris: You could bring a point-and-shoot or camera phone with you everywhere and try to regularly take photos that stress technical aspects. Find everyday situations where you can focus on composition. Make it part of your life instead of taking time out of your life for it.
Aug
6
answered How do you stop yourself from bringing work home?
Jul
29
comment Job title inflation and fluffing
@SnOrfus: You're still not allowed to advertise yourself an Engineer in Canada unless you have a PEng, but most US companies don't change their job titles for Canadian studios. Also, since you're not selling your services to the public, the professional engineering organizations don't notice. If you decided to start consulting and styled yourself as a Software Engineer, you could be reported and sued. They do make some exceptions for careers that predate PEng like the engineer who operates a train.
Jul
28
awarded  Critic
Jul
28
comment If you could only have one programming related book on your bookshelf what would it be and why?
Do many people read this one cover-to-cover? I find it to be more of a reference than a book. (And a reference that you can't search.)
Jul
28
awarded  Commentator
Jul
28
comment Why do people use programming books?
I read your example question, read your answer, and I understand what you mean: Learning the basic syntax is not the same as learning the language. (I didn't even consider not learning the language's constructs.) If you learn just enough Python to write C code in Python, then you still haven't learned to program in Python.
Jul
28
answered Why do people use programming books?
Jul
28
comment Why do people use programming books?
That's an exaggeration. If you started programming Python you could google answers to problems and find things like Python recipes that describe Pythonic solutions to specific problems.
Jul
28
comment Why do people use programming books?
+1 for the pointing out the difference between learning to do something and learning to do it well.
Jul
19
comment If an “either/or” algorithm is “Boolean”, what's a “zero, one, or many” algorithm?
Cartoon illustrating a scangrade test.
Jul
19
answered If an “either/or” algorithm is “Boolean”, what's a “zero, one, or many” algorithm?
Feb
11
comment What are some good practices before checking in source code?
@AviD Good point. Although the output of those tests (even if they're failures) is good content for your commit message. Especially since I haven't had much experience with git bisect.
Feb
9
comment What are some good practices before checking in source code?
@pkoch: I hope that's included in your build break emails.
Feb
9
comment What are some good practices before checking in source code?
@AviD (original answer): don't you still test your code and check your changes before you commit? While I agree that Git is great for having tiny and frequent commits, I still want to vet what gets committed so I can easily roll back to known good changes. Make sure you're improving the code and whatnot.