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  • 18 votes cast
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
15
answered What should a C programmer know?
Feb
15
awarded  Critic
Feb
15
comment Do you contribute to open-source software?
I absolutely agree with this; if you've grown up with a passion in technology and computing you'll be aware of at least a few open-source products and probably had a look at the source. Somebody that has only ever used Dot Net or Flash is likely to be a person that went to university solely to learn an employable skill, not someone that is a passionate technology enthusiast.
Feb
15
comment What would it take to get developers to pay for something that is already freely available as open source?
I paid for Beyond Compare because it did exactly what I needed and saved me the (considerable) trouble of writing something similar myself.
Feb
15
comment When is it ok to use a Global variable
See Software Coupling
Feb
15
comment How to explain my 5 burnt-out years off to a new employer?
Making patch contributions to an open-source product could be a really great way to start.
Feb
11
awarded  Student
Feb
11
answered What should come first: testing or code review?
Feb
11
awarded  Commentator
Feb
11
comment What should a Python developer know while learning Ruby?
Wait, Python doesn't have a ternary operator?
Feb
11
awarded  Peer Pressure
Feb
11
comment Biggest mistake you've ever made
There's still plenty of new code to write. A lot of open source projects require coding from scratch that implements the same functionality as a closed system.
Feb
11
comment Biggest mistake you've ever made
@johnc same would go for most professions. I honestly don't understand people who go to university to "learn programming". I started when I was 14 with K&R. I went to university to "learn electronics" - but guess what, I ended up as a programmer anyway. The very best musicians taught themselves. The very best programmers taught themselves. That's life.
Feb
10
awarded  Teacher
Feb
10
comment Why do business analysts and project managers get higher salaries than programmers?
@TZHX I actually respect managers; they have a difficult job - but a manager need not be technical. The best managers I've had, actually, were not as technical as I was, however they shielded their staff from the politics of other departments and senior management.
Feb
10
comment Why do business analysts and project managers get higher salaries than programmers?
I completely disagree with this philosophy. A good manager will enable the best performance from his responsibilities. A manager is responsible for people. His people are responsible for other things: maybe a nuclear reactor, maybe shining shoes. Good management of people is often very worthwhile and thus management may be rewarded well; however managing the safety of a nuclear reactor is very worthwhile and may be rewarded better in an organisation.
Feb
10
awarded  Supporter