13,199 reputation
33470
bio website bobertville.blogspot.com
location California
age 56
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Dec 12 at 1:07

If you'd like to reach me, check my LinkedIn profile, and you can send InMail from there.


Feb
12
comment Why big companies use Perforce?
@Carl G: If you read all the answers here, you'll find a lot of reasons people have chosen Perforce over git that have nothing to do with git's capabilities around repositories or submodules.
Aug
4
comment Which things instantly ring alarm bells when looking at code?
Good points. I've rewritten the entire post. Thanks to all.
Aug
1
comment What should an embedded developer know on day one?
+1: That was my experience moving into embedded development.
Jul
30
comment Why don't all companies buy developers the best hardware?
@Thomas Boxley: You have a great career ahead of you in management. :-)
Jul
30
comment Is it reasonable to NOT provide technical documentation and unit tests to client?
+1: Based on the "bus factor", I send unsolicited design docs, etc. on my clients, and actively push them to replicate my builds occasionally themselves. "Taking the high road" has worked so well, I'm turning away new work right now. It's also been my experience that trying to squeeze someone's metaphorical gonads does not usually generate a trusting relationship leading to repeat business.
Jul
30
comment Is it reasonable to NOT provide technical documentation and unit tests to client?
+1 for "we get rehired time and again by being great, not by with-holding information." It's worked for me, too, for many years.
Jul
29
comment Why did Git get so much hype? …while others don't?
I would say this in general about both DVCS and CVCS: "All software partakes of the Tao and should not be scorned." "Including software from Redmond?" "Oh, gosh, look at the clock. Class dismissed."
Jul
29
comment Why did Git get so much hype? …while others don't?
@Coyote21: Yup. What's really sad is, SourceSafe before Microsoft bought it was actually quite good for the time. However, I cannot tell you how much time and money the company I used to own wasted on corrupted VSS databases.
Jul
29
comment Why did Git get so much hype? …while others don't?
@Thaddee: I can say from personal experience that's not it at all. Successful companies aren't that dumb - it's more often about the nature of the software being developed, the development model, and whether DVCS or centralized fits better. I could give lots of examples, but for instance, game companies typically use Perforce because it's insanely faster than something like git at managing large binary assets like audio files, 3D scenes and models, and raster images.
Jul
29
comment Why did Git get so much hype? …while others don't?
"I don't see many widely-used non-distributed SCMs out there." It depends on where you are in the industry. Perforce, ClearCase, and svn are still very widely used, just not so much (except for svn) in the open source world. Oh, yes, and Visual Source Safe and MS Team whatever-it-is in Windows shops.
Jul
29
comment Are ads within average Android applications profitable?
This should be moved to answers.onstartups.com
Jul
28
comment How do I know how much to ask for in salary?
+1: This is an example of my main rule of adversarial business negotiations: "Whoever can afford to walk away from the table first always wins." It doesn't hurt to be in that position even if things are cooperative, and you never know when they might turn adversarial, so I always try to always be able and willing to walk.
Jul
28
comment How do I know how much to ask for in salary?
Specific salaries are certainly localized. But a general approach is quite useful, and certainly no more off-topic than a lot of things on this site.
Jul
27
comment best way to quickly stash your cognitive state when you just can't avoid interruptions
+1: There's all kinds of cognitive research to support this. It's like taking written notes when listening to a college lecture. The more parts of your brain you can engage at the moment, the better chance you have of hanging onto the details.
Jul
26
comment Who designed exceptions?
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: My jaw just hit the floor. I knew of Konrad Zuse, but didn't know that. He is the father of us all.
Jul
26
comment How should I determine my rates for writing custom software?
Pretty much, everybody's correct here. :-) As a contractor, there are extra costs, plus you have to figure on being out of work some. The factor of 2 gives you a wild guesstimate on that. You can get fancier than that - which I do, see below. But it gives you a more effective starting place that an employee rate and working up, and is kind of a sanity check that if your other calculations are wildly below it, you need to double-check them to make sure you're not cheating yourself. And it's an old, old rule of thumb - my sister used it as a marketing consultant in 1986.
Jul
26
comment How should I determine my rates for writing custom software?
@Carson: It's a good starting place in the US. A big factor in that metric is planning for being out of work, so I give a discount to long-term clients. I also work from home with no commute time, so I usually apply that time to work. And there are fixed costs, like insurance and office expenses, that drop as a percentage of income as your income goes up. So I wind up charging less than salary/1000, but at 50+ hours a week for which every hour is paid, my net income is still higher than when I was an employee spending the same time on work and commute.
Jul
26
comment How should I determine my rates for writing custom software?
BTW, the last comment applies to the US. Elsewhere, YMMV.
Jul
26
comment How should I determine my rates for writing custom software?
@S. Lott: Employers cover an astonishing array of costs for their employees which a contractor or consultant must cover for themselves. So if you want equivalent lifestyles, your hourly rate as an independent must be about twice what it would be as an employee to cover all that.
Jul
23
comment How much time do you / is acceptable to waste?
@tandu: If the folks at your job know about it and have said they're okay with it, that's all that matters. If that guy had come to my wife and me and said, "Hey, I wrote some code in my spare time and want to test it on your computers some evening after I get my work done," and his projects hadn't been slipping, that would've been fine. It was the sneaking around and spending substantial amounts of time we were paying him for that was a problem.