17,722 reputation
34264
bio website espaces.edu.au/vwrangler
location Australia
age 58
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

Twitter: @vwrangler


Nov
22
comment Stack and Heap memory in Java
Reference: docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/jls-4.html#jls-4.2
Nov
22
comment Stack and Heap memory in Java
The terminology of this Answer is wrong. According to the Java Language Specification, references are NOT primitives. The gist of what the Answer says is correct though. (While you can make an argument that references are "in a sense" primitive is by the by. The JLS defines the terminology for Java, and it says that the primitive types are boolean, byte, short, char, int, long, float and double.)
Nov
13
comment The source is the documentation - part 1
@Kitana - You misunderstood my point about the test suite. I am saying that a test suite probably does exist, but it will have been written for a different purpose. The tests are unlikely to have been designed or written as a specification. Even using them as a compliance test suite is likely to be problematic, because they are likely to be coded to work against internal APIs, and assume implementation-specific behaviour that need not be exhibited by a different implementation of the file system.
Nov
10
revised The source is the documentation - part 1
added 164 characters in body
Nov
10
comment The source is the documentation - part 1
@SJuan76 - We are not talking about file system APIs. We are talking about the design; i.e. what goes into the disk blocks on a BTRFS file system, the procedures / invariants for doing various operations. Internal APIs are not part of a spec of the file system. (They might be the spec of a file system implementation ... but that serves a different purpose, and "the code is the spec" is standard practice for internal APIs in a module codebase that is maybe a few tens of thousand lines.)
Nov
10
comment The source is the documentation - part 1
@Kitana - The point is that that support of (say) BTRFS on (say) Windows is not something that the developers of BTRFS are interested in. But I'm sure that if >>you<< wanted to document and publich the file system layout, invariants, etc as part of your project to port BTRFS, they would not stand in your way.
Nov
9
revised The source is the documentation - part 1
added 108 characters in body
Nov
9
revised The source is the documentation - part 1
added 108 characters in body
Nov
9
answered The source is the documentation - part 1
Oct
15
revised Java Multithreading and CPU cores
added 479 characters in body
Oct
14
answered Java Multithreading and CPU cores
Sep
24
comment What makes for a bad case for quick sort?
@david.pfx - "Some" ... YES. "Almost every" ... NO.
Sep
23
comment What makes for a bad case for quick sort?
"... and in almost every case the worst case is really bad so it is worth testing for it.". That is debatable. When I look at this table: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… I conclude that for most "good" sort algorithms (i.e. with average O(NlogN) performance or better) the worst and average cases have the same complexity. That suggests that is usually NOT worth testing for the worst case(s). (Given that the test is probably O(N) ... or worse.)
Sep
15
revised Why does java.util.ArrayList allow to add null?
added 39 characters in body
Sep
13
revised Is a long list of parameter checks an anti-pattern?
added 135 characters in body
Sep
13
answered Is a long list of parameter checks an anti-pattern?
Sep
5
awarded  Yearling
Sep
1
answered How to let the outside world decorate my private field?
Aug
23
revised How do operating systems… run… without having an OS to run in?
added 16 characters in body
Aug
23
revised Do threads delete themselves?
added 23 characters in body