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Oct
18
revised Are we queueing and serializing properly?
emphasised performance problem
Oct
18
comment How can a beginner develop an algorithm for this problem?
Your algorithm literally runs for the door at the end. That's so cool.
Oct
18
awarded  Promoter
Oct
15
asked Are we queueing and serializing properly?
Oct
1
accepted What's the name of this pattern involving multiple inputs and what to do based on an input?
Oct
1
accepted Interfaces on an abstract class
Oct
1
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
27
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
15
awarded  Yearling
Jan
30
comment I have data that sends in “bursts” of 100 records with a significant delay. How do I structure my classes for multithreading?
I hate when I write a big library to solve a lot of problems only to find its already built into .NET. +1
Jan
30
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
5
comment Extracting useful information from free text
@MichaelT: yes thats a valid range.
Dec
4
comment Extracting useful information from free text
@MichaelT: the variable part stays within the same character class, but both pieces might vary independently. It's not uncommon to see 100A-300L, or 100AA-200ZZ
Dec
4
comment Extracting useful information from free text
@sugaredlightning: can't guarantee that. They might want 1-100
Dec
4
asked Extracting useful information from free text
Sep
5
comment Interfaces on an abstract class
This happens half the time. He always prefers to implement the interface on the base class, and I always prefer to implement it on the final concrete. The scenario you presented happens often and is part of the reason interfaces on the base bothers me.
Sep
4
asked Interfaces on an abstract class
Aug
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
16
comment Why is using System.out.println() so bad?
No. It's a quick test, who cares?
Jul
26
comment What's the name of this pattern involving multiple inputs and what to do based on an input?
This seems to match perfectly, and I'm glad to see it's not an antipattern. Plus, a fractional percentage decrease in runtime performance but an integer percentage increase in maintainability and productivity usually leads to better overall code written ... slow implementations of faster algorithms probably wins over fast implementations of slow algorithms.