606 reputation
39
bio website paul-ebermann.tumblr.com
location Berlin, Germany
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

Don't fear to edit my posts: even if I have more reputation than you, I do make mistakes.

I'm now also a Moderator Pro Tempore (= until the first elections) at Cryptography Stack Exchange: feel free to come around and ask some cryptography questions.


My personal name is spoken as /ˈpawlo/ (IPA), in English this would be written similar to Powlo, I think (i.e. the vowels are ow and o), with an accent on the before-last syllable (which is the first in this case). It's the Esperanto form of my given name.

The photo shows my shadow, taken at night. My camera sometimes seems to forget all the other frequencies and only stores the green ones.

My current main private programming project is the game of fencing, an online abstract turn based strategy game. Implemented as a Java applet, using git as a version control system.


Some more links:


Jun
24
awarded  Yearling
Jun
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
2
comment Is this simple XOR encrypted communication absolutely secure?
@PlasmaHH Often attackers have other means of guessing the plaintext (or sections thereof) by out-of-channel information – e.g. you might now it is one of 100 specific files, and you can guess which one by looking at the file size. (A guess doesn't need to be always correct to be an acceptable attack.) Then you can replace one part of the file by something else, and the user either gets your malicious executable, or non-working stuff.
Jun
2
revised Is this simple XOR encrypted communication absolutely secure?
update due to my misunderstanding of the protocol
Jun
2
comment Is this simple XOR encrypted communication absolutely secure?
@user3123061 I did miss this "sent the counter" in your protocol, sorry. Though if that counter is not protected, you'll be using the same key block twice if the attacker replays a block (maybe slightly modified).
Jun
1
awarded  Yearling
Jun
1
answered Is this simple XOR encrypted communication absolutely secure?
Jul
31
comment Who should be responsible to write test cases?
Do "junior coders" don't do any "actual" coding in your team? What are they doing then?
Apr
16
comment Readable regular expressions without losing their power?
That Regex is an example on why you shouldn't use a regex for every parsing/matching task. It still misses the capture of the octets into groups, though that would not be difficult to add.
Feb
18
awarded  Caucus
Feb
6
comment Are unit tests really that useful?
Ah, you mean "knowing to write working code"? It looks like you only have a quite small circle of potential developers. Or do you mean "manual testing"? I think this is not an alternative to unit testing, they complete each other. If your manual testers can test all features of your 4 millions of lines of code for each release, you either don't release often or have quite few features per line. I'm happy for every automatic test that shows a mistake before the QA team has to catch ist (or even misses it), even if those tests don't catch everything.
Feb
6
comment Are unit tests really that useful?
So, what is your alternative to automated tests? Use a formal theorem prover to demonstrate that the code is correct? Or prove it manually, and never change it again since the cost to prove it again is too high? Don't do anything and hope nothing breaks?
Feb
6
comment Why does automated testing keep failing in my company?
In the case of unit- and integration-testing, the people who should write the tests are the developers, not separate "test engineers". (As written in the question, the QA, i.e. the test engineers, actually already use automated UI tests.)
Aug
24
comment Is defining a variable to name a method argument a good practice?
I think this can be better written in the dot-notation (doSomethingOptions.PREVENTUNDO) instead of the array access notation.
Aug
24
comment Is defining a variable to name a method argument a good practice?
So you would convert a function with a boolean argument in two functions which only differ in a tiny part of their code (where the original would have an if(param) {...} else {...})?
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Apr
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
26
awarded  Yearling
Apr
26
answered What makes a hashing algorithm “secure”?
Apr
26
comment What makes a hashing algorithm “secure”?
Jeff has it wrong here on the second point ... while for some uses (as password hashing and key derivation from a password) you want to be slow, for other uses (like message authentication, signatures, etc.) fast (secure) hash functions are good.