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visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Apr 9 at 17:16

Mar
17
awarded  Custodian
Mar
17
answered How important is it to clean up someone else's code when faced with a tight deadline?
Feb
17
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
awarded  Yearling
Feb
8
comment How can I deal with a team member who dislikes making comments in code?
The question of comments should be linked to why the code is doing what it is doing and not what it is doing. Because ime quite a lot of coders are lazy, they go for the minimum they can get away with without actually providing adding value. It's entirely possible that self documenting code exists but it is heavily dependent on a perfect design which in the real world rarely exists and when modifications are required, game over. Document the why, not the how.
Feb
8
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
23
comment Why aren't young programmers interested in mainframes?
Slightly stunned to see this question got zombied. Quite a few interesting comments turning up. 1) inclined to wonder how many people are aware of how much business goes through a mainframe 2) that they run Linux now, for example 3) they're not all Cobol. My issue is that there tends to be short term management of them - so that people are wary of getting trapped with them. This is because lack of proactive business planning. People don't want to get trapped but managers don't plan for a future of people moving on with mainframes. Thanks for commenting you all.
Jan
15
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
26
comment How to tell whether your programmers are under-performing?
Interesting. A couple of things stand out to me here: 1) you haven't actually said anything about the quality of what he delivers. Is it good or is it bad? 2) bugtrackers are for fixing bugs. Is he mostly developing or mostly bugfixing? Or are you using the bugtracker as a developer time management tool? 3) the comment regarding the sprints suggests a certain amount of overpromising rather than underdelivering. It sounds to me your key complaint is that you do not know what he is doing. The time off thing I would not look at in isolation but for his entire working life at the company.
Oct
25
comment Why don't research papers that mention custom software release the source code?
@codingFriend1 - you cannot and should not generalise on the basis of one single experience. That is a deeply unscientific approach. You have to consider who the target audience for a research specialist is and in many, many cases, it is not people who need the kind of explanation you consider necessary. This is what we have scientific communications for - to bridge to the non-specialists.
Oct
25
answered Why don't research papers that mention custom software release the source code?
Oct
25
comment Why don't research papers that mention custom software release the source code?
I don't think you are being fully fair here: "Instead, in the research community it is more important to have an article that sounds and looks very scientific.". This implies that there is no value to the underlying content, almost because you can't understand it because it looks scientific. The number of papers you publish is almost irrelevant if no one is much interested in the content. This response, in my view, speaks of your prejudices rather than reality.
Jul
18
comment How do you disarm a cowboy coder?
But nothing should get onto production without acquiring relevant sign off. Are you telling me he circumvents normal change control?
Jul
18
answered How do you disarm a cowboy coder?
Jul
18
answered What do you say in a code review when the other person built an over complicated solution?
Jul
12
comment Is committing/checking in code everyday a good practice?
I don't think you can state one position is right or wrong without knowing what the local architecture and versioning rules are.
Jun
8
awarded  Constituent
Jun
8
awarded  Caucus
Apr
5
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
4
comment Why aren't young programmers interested in mainframes?
Not here any more.