151 reputation
6
bio website khedron.livejournal.com
location Ohio
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Oct 30 '13 at 19:52
Programmer, sci-fi reader, lucky enough to have the mythical Lisp Day Job.

Mar
13
comment Python potential for science applications?
+1 for numpy and general advice.
Sep
21
comment Help us with our git workflow
There is indeed something wrong with having lots of branches. As much as possible, you should try to make your variations data-driven instead of hardcoded into the software. If you absolutely have to have custom code, then you should analyze your application and figure out what parts of that are the ones which you need flexibility in, and make those plugins or other swappable modules, running in a universal container.
Aug
28
comment When to Use workflow engines?
+1 for Lisp reference - code is data, and vice-versa.
Feb
9
comment What are graph datastores better at doing than other datastores and why?
This isn't at the right level to be a good "why is this different?" paper, but this might give youa taste: franz.com/agraph/support/documentation/current/…
Feb
9
comment How long do programmers generally stay in industry?
@tehnyit: You'd be surprised. I know a number of programmers in their 50s who've resisted the "promotion" to management.
Nov
28
comment Why is Lisp useful?
Updating running code (carefully!) on a production server is one of the joys of Lisp, yes. Python, at least when I was playing with it, did not do this well; you'd have to manually recompile all functions/methods which referred to your changes, while all Common Lisp implementations handle that for you. I use that same power for development: write, test something, edit, test -- no compile loop, and you can take your interactive tests & turn them into unit tests if you wish.
Apr
13
comment How do you bill your procrastination?
+1, although that's more for the chess clock part, not the fixed bid.
Jan
26
comment What's your favourite quote about programming?
@Timwi: My apologies!
Nov
15
comment What is the (craziest, stupidest, silliest) thing a client/boss asked you to do?
Depends on the language, and how many languages you already know -- and how much mastery of it they expect you to have on Monday morning.
Nov
15
comment What is the (craziest, stupidest, silliest) thing a client/boss asked you to do?
That's pretty common. It's called "buzzword compliance".
Nov
12
comment Whats the greatest most impressive programing feat you ever witnessed?
Re git: "Linus Torvalds' Greatest Invention" perl.plover.com/yak/git
Nov
12
comment What is the most egregious waste of money you have seen, and what did you do about it?
"Self-Indulgent Waffle". Beautiful.
Nov
10
comment What should I study to 'learn' Comp Sci?
@JS: Well, that's why I said "most" math. But I do agree with the rest that the training that goes into math (and physics!) is very useful for programmers.
Nov
8
comment As a programmer, are you required to do timesheets?
Ooof. Everything was essentially fixed-price consulting? That's terrible. It's not your fault if the task is specified poorly or the allotted hours estimated are just wrong.
Nov
8
comment What should I study to 'learn' Comp Sci?
I think (most) math is less important than data structures, algorithmic complexity assessment, and understanding something about design patterns (so that you recognize the concepts when you read about them).
Nov
8
comment What is Java used for these days?
That wasn't a question about native-compiled vs. bytecode-compiled languages, actually. As I understand it, Fortran used to have some of the best numerical libraries and was geared as a language to be easier to doing numerical computations. So, 10 years ago at least, I knew people who were running combinations of C++ and Fortran for supercomputing applications.
Nov
5
comment What is Java used for these days?
Fortran's forte used to be speed of numerical computation, as I understand it. How does Java compare on that front?
Oct
16
comment What's the worst programming book you've ever read?
@SnOrfus: I use command line svn all the time -- both on the linux servers, and locally on my Mac. I have a svn GUI (Versions) which is great for browsing, looking at logs, blame, etc, but I find it faster to pick out specific subsets of files to commit, or look at logs for specific date ranges, via the command line.
Oct
14
comment Stuff every programmer needs while working
Sometimes not having a super-fast computer means you have to pay more attention to detail (and optimization), which means your program will behave better on your user's wimpy computers.
Oct
14
comment Stuff every programmer needs while working
I'm not sure about this one. It depends on what language/environment you're using. If the notion of a "project" of files is built into the IDE, then you may have to use the standard IDE with everyone else. Context will matter here.