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Jul
25
comment How do you explain a 'statement' in programming?
@Pharap in most of the languages I've used in the past few years, 1; is a valid statement — it's just useless and likely to provoke a warning.
Jul
25
comment How do you explain a 'statement' in programming?
In many languages, any expression can be a statement, and there are additionally some statements that don't have values and can't be used as expressions. Some languages, however, define certain kinds of expressions that must be used for their value and can't stand alone as statements.
Jun
13
comment Why do programs use call stacks, if nested function calls can be inlined?
Can someone apply some better tags to this? The only tag on the question, "functional-programming", is clearly not appropriate.
Jun
13
comment How Do News Websites E.g. Forbes / Zdnet Seamlessly Merge One Webpage into Another?
@KRyan it just modifies the offset param that skips a certain distance into the resultset. Since the default sort order seems to be "popular all time" the results are probably somewhat stable, but definitely not if you switch the sort order to "newest" and search for something popular.
Jun
13
comment How Do News Websites E.g. Forbes / Zdnet Seamlessly Merge One Webpage into Another?
@OllieFord that's what the history API stuff is for. history.pushState and history.replaceState let you change the URL in the address bar without navigating away from the current page. It's the more modern replacement of the older trick of changing the URL fragment (#something), with a big advantage being that the history API lets you push "real" URLs that the server can participate in generating, while the fragment thing has to be supported completely from the client side.
Jun
9
comment What is the “type” of data that pointers hold in the C language?
Addresses can be put into one-to-one correspondence with integers, but so can everything else on a computer :)
Apr
24
comment Explanation of how server-side programming languages are accessed
I don't think this does enough to mention the (by now very common) practice of simply having each application be its own webserver, most likely fronted by one or more HTTP proxies.
Feb
12
comment Difference between overhead of B frame and P frame
@JerryCoffin depends on the details of the format. You could imagine it to be super simple like MPEG-2. But in any case I'm hand-waving here :)
Feb
12
comment Difference between overhead of B frame and P frame
@Sara B-frames reference the past and the future. If the intermediate B-frame was a linear function of the past reference frame and the future reference frame, it could be essentially empty; it only has to code the difference between the interpolated frame and the real thing.
Dec
29
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Dec
29
comment If MVC is “Separation of Concerns” then why was Razor Syntax introduced?
@Doval Twig/Swig is an example of a logic-lite templating system that's been popular enough to be cloned into many languages; ZPT/TAL is an older one with more XML crud but the same goals. Both allow user functions for filtering and advanced conditionals, but no code in the host language is ever found in the template itself; it's more like registering a limited set of callbacks by name. The templating language itself is deliberately far from Turing-complete.
Dec
29
comment If MVC is “Separation of Concerns” then why was Razor Syntax introduced?
@EricKing except for the part where templating systems that allow arbitrary code always lead, via path of least resistance, to bad design, horrible layering violation, and unmaintainability. Unfortunately, it seems to be a lesson that every community has to learn on its own.
Oct
21
comment Why are floating point numbers used often in Science/Engineering?
Floating point isn't "random precision", the errors for various operations are predictable and well-known, and the errors for an algorithm can be worked out. If they're low enough (and in particular if your backwards errors are smaller than the uncertanties in your input variables) then you can be certain that your results are good (or at least that any problems with them aren't caused by floating-point error).
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
18
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
16
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
15
awarded  Mortarboard
Sep
15
awarded  Nice Answer