698 reputation
58
bio website
location New Jersey
age 28
visits member for 4 years
seen 15 hours ago

I'm a programmer, occasional sysadmin, Unix automator, and general geek living in New Jersey (but in the general sphere of New York City).

The majority of my code is written in Perl (my weapon of choice) but I'm also familiar with C, JavaScript, and Bourne sh and bash. I also have some passing familiarity with (or ancient memories of) Java, C++, Python, Prolog, BASIC, older flavors of Visual Basic, and more.

I dabble in Haskell but I've never thrown a real problem at it.

I run Linux at home and at work but that doesn't mean I'm ignorant of other systems :)


Sep
18
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
17
awarded  Yearling
Sep
16
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
15
awarded  Mortarboard
Sep
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
15
awarded  Yearling
Sep
15
revised Why do some languages round to the nearest EVEN integer?
deleted 6 characters in body
Sep
15
answered Why do some languages round to the nearest EVEN integer?
Sep
5
awarded  Critic
Sep
5
revised What licenses are compatible with MASM32's license requirements?
Call it MASM32 throughout for clarity, and also CC-SA isn't just one license.
Sep
5
revised What licenses are compatible with MASM32's license requirements?
added 17 characters in body
Sep
5
answered What licenses are compatible with MASM32's license requirements?
Sep
5
comment In layman's terms, what is left recursion?
@Panzercrisis more or less. You really need to go look up the meanings of LL, LR, and recursive-descent parsers.
Sep
5
awarded  Editor
Sep
5
revised In layman's terms, what is left recursion?
typo
Sep
5
answered In layman's terms, what is left recursion?
Jul
9
comment Why do some functional programming languages use a space for function application?
Nor are non-functional languages that unanimous in requiring parentheses; for a few examples, Smalltalk has object method: args, Objective C has [object method: args], and Ruby and Perl both allow omitting parentheses in function and method calls, only requiring them to resolve ambiguity.
Feb
25
awarded  Caucus
Jan
9
comment Is this statement from Knuth's fundamental algorithms still applicable today?
It's not clear to me in what sense it was ever true — 10! is a mere few million. Too large for direct comprehension, but not particularly hard to compute with, even with pen and paper.