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Dec
10
comment When should var be used instead of declaring an explicit type?
They are exactly the same, var is strongly type but leaves the typing of the variable to the compiler. In this case the compiler would choose the type IEnumerable<int> . You could have fun creating some tests and seeing which one is more efficient in memory usage or access speed or whatever metric you chose, but they are the same.
Aug
21
comment How do you evaluate learning C# from videos for a beginner?
C# in Depth is a great book, it is a terrible recommendation for either a first book (or a second book) or a book that "covers the core fundamentals of the language in a systematic way" (the same applies to Effective C#).
Feb
6
comment What things do I need to become expert ASP.net MVC
ASP.NET ships with jQuery, I would suggest that understanding how ASP.NET uses jQuery for core elements like client side validation, as well as the concept of progressive enhancement would be useful.
Dec
21
comment Transitioning from being a bespoke development to a COTS development house
From the perspective of our organisation I think the selling bit is not so difficult (at the moment). We have solved a bit of a niche problem in a user friendly manner and lots of people in the sector we work in have come to us wanting our solution. We need to be able to sell that solution in a packaged manner rather than custom developing the whole thing each time (with multiple code bases to support).
Dec
15
comment Could Most Software Companies & Users Benefit From Rolling Versions
How much do you pay for Chrome.
Oct
28
comment What is likely to be the bottleneck between the SQL Server, IIS and .net when receiving json as text from the DB?
I think there is something wrong with your code, not a technology/infrastructure limitation and the various components of your system need to be profiled. That aside, it may be useful to set the Idle Time-out of your Application Pools in IIS to 0 minutes. This will make it clearer what in that time is actually processing and what is just an IIS thread starting up.
Oct
6
comment Maintaining a list of nodes with challenging requirements
I think there is no need to write on every operation but instead write back the entire route once a route reorganisation has been finalised by the user.
Oct
6
comment Maintaining a list of nodes with challenging requirements
@S.Lott I have used the term ideally in the OP to express one of the constraints is that this operation should take place within the context of functionality which is currently delivered employing a RBDMS as a persistence layer. I used the phrasing 'ideally' as that represents not the ideal platform to solve this particular problem but the ideal solution within the organisational context of the question. If the arguments away from a RDBMS for this area of functionality are sufficiently persuasive then it may be an option but there would be a lot of organisational inertia to deal with.
Oct
6
comment Maintaining a list of nodes with challenging requirements
A node would never be used on more than one route. If a solution enforced that a route could not be modified concurrently I believe that would be acceptable (there is no explicit requirement for route modification concurrency).
Sep
22
comment How do I optimize a web application for high-latency users?
In many cases splitting your responses would have a negative affect rather than a positive one based on the size and the overhead of the responses.
Sep
19
comment What should take precedence: YAGNI or Good Design?
Dan North almost rants against YAGNI see infoq.com/presentations/Sharpening-the-Tools and bloggingabout.net/blogs/vagif/archive/2011/03/09/…. Not saying that I agree with him that makes at least one active developer in today's software world that would rant against YAGNI (make that two with the blogger who reposted it).
Sep
8
comment Is there a reason for initial overconfidence of scientists and engineers working on artificial intelligence in the 1960s?
I believe this is the correct answer rather than the hubris theory, which seems to strongly supported on this site. The things that we thought were incredibly hard for humans turned out to be relatively easy for machines, on the other hand incredibly simple things for humans are very hard for machines.
Sep
5
comment Nightly builds for one-man projects
100% agree, working on effectively a two man project at the moment and we have no need for nightly builds, it just is not necessary. Source control (and solid backups of source control), on the other hand, is a must. If you are doing a solo gig then something like Mercurial is a good option.
Aug
5
comment How can I “get in the know”?
I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me.
Aug
5
comment Why do we need different JS for different browsers
I also probably should mention, as you have asked, that Douglas Crockford's 'JavaScript: The Good Parts" is pretty useful in this area. He presents the negative of what you are asking, demonstrates the areas where javascript is good and works, a corollary of that is that there are significant areas where javascipt is bad (or freakin' awful - I'm looking at you parseInt) and should be avoided.
Aug
5
comment It's my first week of work, I've got the code checked out and am told to look around it until I have an assignment next week. What do I do?
+1 for Domain knowledge. A little can go along way and it massively helps if you know what the users of your system are talking about.
Aug
5
comment Why do we need different JS for different browsers
Completely agree that HTML5 currently is not a solution to the problem you are facing. What I think is the case, however, is that the HTML5 description of the current state of HTML goes along way to answering your original question.
Aug
5
comment Alternatives to Java Applet for interactive Websites
Stats for how many people turn off Javascript developer.yahoo.com/blogs/ydn/posts/2010/10/… Possibly less than the OP would suggest.
Aug
4
comment Why would a company develop an atmosphere which discourage code comments?
Let the commenting flame wars commence ... But just before that I would just like to point out the Code Complete II section 32.3 - The Commento.
Aug
3
comment Minimising little coding mistakes
If your example of getting the angle bracket in the wrong direction was within a test of inequality then one good way to avoid or minimise that is to standardise the way that you test for inequalities. I think I got this from Code Complete, that you always test consistently. I test left to right, lowest to highest. This gives you the benefit of a consistent approach, easier to read code and helps mistakes stand out. Of course you could be using angle brackets to do other things, like opening closing tags, and in that case this comment is useless.