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Oct
16
answered Is there such a thing as a “when” statement?
Oct
15
comment From TFS to Git
By 'checking in/out', I was actually talking about the way lock-based VCS's implement things, not how you can download source files for editing (which is indeed something every VCS must be able to do). The fact that many VCS's refer to the mere process of downloading a file as 'checkout' is a bit of a misnomer IMO - nothing is checked, and the repository does not remember who has the file.
Oct
15
comment From TFS to Git
Why is it that windows folks are so obsessed about graphical interfaces?
Oct
15
comment From TFS to Git
@kylben: checking in/out is one way to look at version control; editing-and-merge is another way. Some VCS's use the former approach, giving you exclusive locks and the ability to check out individual files; others take the latter, and with those, you download the entire repository, make your local changes, and then push them back to the remote; the VCS takes care of managing conflicting changes, asking for your input in case of doubt. Neither approach is better, but you can't usually bend a VCS into the one it hasn't been made for.
Oct
14
comment Type-clarifying comments and type checking in dynamic languages
@back2dos: speaking from Python experience (which, unlike PHP, has a strong coding style culture), 'is-a' is often frowned upon as an avoidable hack, and the general attitude is that you should check for individual features rather than declared type. In a way, this makes sense, because it allows for such things as calling stream reading methods on otherwise unrelated custom objects, as long as they (informally) implement the required interface.
Oct
14
answered What are possible/useful implementations when extending exceptions?
Oct
14
comment Type-clarifying comments and type checking in dynamic languages
@back2dos: there's the cultural difference. In dynamic-languages land, you have to expect to be treated as a duck if you can walk and quack. The upside of this is that you don't need to go through formal routines to get the duck treatment, but the downside is that you may unintentionally get the duck treatment for looking too much like one.
Oct
14
comment Type-clarifying comments and type checking in dynamic languages
And for the record, I prefer strongly-typed languages myself...
Oct
14
comment Type-clarifying comments and type checking in dynamic languages
The whole 'fail early' thing is basically my point. In dynamic languages, you cannot fail early (== compile time) on type errors. You only have two chances to fail - immediately before calling a function, and while calling a function. Using type checking over fail-and-recover can move the failure from 'while' to 'immediately before', but the benefit is marginal.
Oct
13
answered Type-clarifying comments and type checking in dynamic languages
Oct
12
comment Which popular object-oriented languages support readonly methods?
@Jeff Grigg: If you're determined enough, a program can scan its own memory image to fiddle with bytes directly - no compiler in the world is stopping you from doing things like that.
Oct
12
comment What is easier to do with web applications compared to native GUI applications?
@mcottle: That's a fair compromise - you still use a few of the benefits, and you have to figure out solutions for a few other things such as storage and authentication, but other than that, the decision is ultimately an individual one, and the factors differ from case to case. (And if the cost for a web application is significantly higher than a desktop application would have been, including setup and maintenance, then you're being screwed.)
Oct
12
comment How can I properly manage commits, prevent feature conflicts, and manage dependencies with a VCS?
@ldigas: In what way do git and hg "suck" worse with binary files than svn does? Neither can track changes in binaries beyond per-file granularity, with all associated consequences. Also, they do both make svn mostly obsolete, seeing how either can do exactly what svn does (apart from a few obscure features), and then some; you just have to set it up that way. The best reason for using svn that I can think of is that you're using it already and migrating would be too painful / risky / expensive.
Oct
12
answered What's the difference between syntax and semantics?
Oct
11
comment How much data should be required in a request to a webservice?
There is one thing though - if you're processing orders for an online store, the price in your database may change between filling the cart and posting the actual order. If you let the client post the price alongside the product code, you can catch this scenario and return a warning instead of silently processing the order at the new price.
Oct
11
comment Could it be more efficient for systems in general to do away with Stacks and just use Heap for memory management?
@Donal Fellows: All true. But the point is that stacks and heaps both have their strong and weak points, and using them accordingly will yield the most efficient code.
Oct
11
comment Could it be more efficient for systems in general to do away with Stacks and just use Heap for memory management?
@JBRWilkinson: edited.
Oct
11
revised Could it be more efficient for systems in general to do away with Stacks and just use Heap for memory management?
deleted 10 characters in body
Oct
9
revised Could it be more efficient for systems in general to do away with Stacks and just use Heap for memory management?
added 48 characters in body
Oct
9
awarded  Nice Answer