129 reputation
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location Stockholm, Sweden
age 55
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Sep 10 '13 at 12:25

May
28
awarded  Commentator
May
28
awarded  Teacher
Mar
12
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
@Spoike: modularity cannot be a goal in itself. If code readability and maintainability are important then modularization will arise as a by-product to the extent that R&M can be kept at an acceptable to optimal level (for the organization at hand). Too much modularization will undermine R&M as will too little.
Mar
12
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
I can see that indiscrimant object and variable declarations at different nesting levels make the code that mch more difficult to read. However, just because something is available doesn't free the programmer from the responsibility of writing readable code and therefore doesn't require him to use it just because it's there. If more readable code requires declarations to be bunched together and not spread all over the place then what's the problem with that? C programmers may write super-tricky code yet at least 99% of them do not because they realize that it hurts readability.
Mar
11
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
@David Thornley: I just hate trying to get printers to work. However, that pro on Linux does not outweigh all the pros on Windows - for me that is.
Mar
11
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
@quanticle: on my work screen with 1920 pixels and 8 bit wide characters I can fit over 200 character columns and since I neither use hard tabs or eight position tabs it is much easier to write something readable with more than three indentations. You should try it sometime!
Mar
11
comment If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
@Mikel: I don't know where you got the Linux kernel from and that was not what I was commenting: I was commenting how difficult it was (is?) to get even the simplest display to work under Linux, especially when compared to Windows. As to three indentations at least I didn't say that that was the reason behind my display problems. However if there are only 80 columns and you have three 8 character indentations you're 24 columns (almost a third) into the screen with 56 left to write code in which is not a lot so in that context I understand the three indentation rule. Cont ...
Mar
10
answered If you need more than 3 levels of indentation, you're screwed?
Feb
28
comment What optimizations are premature?
@wheaties: Ok so there's some sort of absolute line (or boundary?) at a few (I think you mean) milliseconds and above that you do something and below you don't on a case by case basis. Is that a fair summation of your comment?
Feb
26
comment What optimizations are premature?
As to my "complete quote" Jon Hanna's quote (above) is "more" complete :-)
Feb
26
comment What optimizations are premature?
@DJClayworth: The ONLY exception? Honestly, anyone claiming ANYTHING as unequivocally as that in the complex world of dos and don'ts, whys and why nots concerning how to construct well-performing systems should not and cannot be taken seriously. Perhaps you should just read instead?
Feb
25
comment What optimizations are premature?
@Stefano Borini: unless you're a complete newbie you should have at least somewhat of an inkling of what performance is possible beforehand. If you're experienced it should no longer be an inkling (though I've seen such "professionals" too) but rather a pretty good idea. As stated elsewhere in answers to this questions a performance-savvy programmer will write better-performing code without thinking about it - and at no extra penalty to the project - than one who isn't and who has never thought about performance. A well-performing system starts at the drawing-board though.
Feb
25
comment What optimizations are premature?
@supercat: i'd call it applying hard-earned experience to everyday programming. Your choices and constructs are somewhat different (but not overly so) from what a newbie might write, they take no extra time (for you) to write yet and in the end they could well be the difference between being a project's hero or a zero. In achieving hard-erned experience I gather you've been called a "premature optimizer" on numerous occasions and been proud of it! :-)
Feb
25
comment What optimizations are premature?
@wheaties: you claim that "In embedded systems, space/time/processing power are limited and the usual rules don't apply" does this mean that you believe that "In non-embedded systems, space/time/processing power are unlimited and the usual rules apply". How do you know where to draw the line?
Feb
10
answered What optimizations are premature?