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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Jul 22 '13 at 7:06

Student at University of Maryland College Park.


Mar
25
accepted Are developers expected to have skills of business analysts?
Mar
24
revised Are developers expected to have skills of business analysts?
deleted 37 characters in body
Mar
24
revised Are developers expected to have skills of business analysts?
added 103 characters in body
Mar
24
asked Are developers expected to have skills of business analysts?
Mar
12
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
comment cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
It seems like you're talking more about worst-case cost than probability? If you're proposing that cost cannot be calculated without risk -- then can risk be calculated without cost?
Jan
8
comment cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
@Jarrod, I reworded the title to be consistent with the question as written, which remains to ask about trade-offs, rather than an absolute "which is best".
Jan
8
revised cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
added 249 characters in body
Jan
8
revised cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
edited title
Jan
7
awarded  Quorum
Jan
7
comment cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
+1 but not marked answer since it doesn't answer the question as you say it's wrong; so if you think the question is wrong, then please at least answer the "correct" question.
Jan
7
comment Stored Procedures a bad practice at one of worlds largest IT software consulting firms?
2) on unit testing stored procs. idk about other unit test frameworks but at least with MS Test (VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting), running any of the Assert methods on the stored proc at least requires a Db connection, which by definition makes it more of an integration test than a unit test. And a stored proc may reference state about the database at a global, database level. These may not be fake-able or have interfaces.
Jan
7
comment T-SQL stored procs orders of magnitude faster than LINQ
"runtime performance is irrelevant"? but tell that to the users or developers who spend their time on performance-tuning. Judging by the extended comments yet no answer to the actual question, it seems that either the answer is none or that you don't know?
Jan
7
revised cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
edited title
Jan
7
comment T-SQL stored procs orders of magnitude faster than LINQ
But those JOIN questions (lol) aren't mine. One of the LINQ providers I wrote does support JOINs. stackoverflow.com/a/6350766/266457. And for any functions which don't have a direct T-SQL translation, the Expression tree can still be evaluated as much as possible, and let the remainder of the Expression tree be evaluated in .NET - besides the fact that the query could otherwise be immediately executed, and then run the Regex/financial functions w/ LINQ to objects afterwards.
Jan
7
comment T-SQL stored procs orders of magnitude faster than LINQ
@qes I'm aware of limitations of LINQ, e.g. the following throws an exception in LINQ2SQL VS2010, even though the second part of the BinaryExpression shouldn't need to be evaluated: int? version = null; var books = db.Textbooks.Where(b => version == null || b.Version == (int)version); Trig and financial functions don't seem to be of them. e.g. where is the issue in running the following? var courses = db.Courses.Where(c => Math.Sin(c.Credits) != 1).ToArray(); Most financial (and trig) functions seem to require scalar parameters anyway, not rowsets.
Jan
7
revised cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
added 224 characters in body
Jan
7
asked cost trade-offs for deploying changes to prod, stored procs vs. LINQ
Jan
6
comment T-SQL stored procs orders of magnitude faster than LINQ
@qes: Trig functions not happening? How about financial functions? I definitely see those commonly in stored procs. Iteration w/ state not happening? FETCH. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180152.aspx String manipulation? Last time I checked LINQ to SQL, the String functions were supported. Besides that, string, regex functions that show up in the SELECT statement are easily applied after the call to IQueryProvider.Execute. programmers.stackexchange.com/a/65810/19936
Jan
6
comment T-SQL stored procs orders of magnitude faster than LINQ
@qes: Yes I do. More than 2, but not dozens, and I've written 2. Which are the dozens you've worked with? It seems that simplest table selects cannot be that different across different providers (and besides contradicting "cannot generalize"), how differently can a stored proc represent a simple select than LINQ to SQL can generate the equivalent T-SQL? The LINQ-to-T-SQL translators are already provided by the ORM framework, so where's the fight?