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Sep
18
comment Branching breaks continous integration?
Actually, I think that we need two "central" branches -- one as a "throwaway_integration" branch that exists purely as a quick merge-and-test check for features actively under development, and another "master" or "stable" branch that contains features after they have reached a certain level of stability/maturity. Developers pull stable code to work on from the second "stable" / "master" branch, and merge & push changes frequently to the first "unstable" / "throwaway_integration" branch. CI tests should run on both branches, of course.
Sep
18
comment Branching breaks continous integration?
I do agree that the use of feature branches is (slightly) at odds with the CI concept. However, it is possible to create a CI system that does not require reconfiguration to run on feature branches. (I have done this in the past with some simple python scripts), and it can be useful when your "feature" branches are actually being used as release stabilization branches, where CI is absolutely required.
Sep
18
comment Branching breaks continous integration?
@Kevin: You are most likely right. I've been using git (almost) exclusively since Feb '13 -- about a month after I wrote the above response ... so I am not particularly up-to-date on what changes have happened to Mercurial since then.
May
13
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
21
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
awarded  Yearling
Jan
9
answered Is it a bad practice to include all the enums in one file and use it in multiple classes?
Dec
12
answered Location of Solution Components - Centralisation versus Multiple Instances versus Libraries
Oct
24
answered where do you track team Decisions
Oct
3
answered Monitor screen size and programming ease
Aug
16
answered Is it possible to reach absolute zero bug state for large scale software?
Aug
12
comment Meaning of MIT license
Even as a native speaker, I found it difficult to understand. If the permission notice has to be included in all copies of the software, and if compiled binaries are still "copies of the software", then seemingly the permission notice has to be included with your compiled binaries. If you are including the permission notice, then seemingly you are giving recipients permission to copy "the software" -- i.e. both the MIT-licensed library software and your own software together. I know that this is not the intent of the license ... but still, it is confusing to the literal minded such as myself.
May
29
awarded  Popular Question
May
10
comment My customer wants me to record a video of how I develop his software product
Actually, I would be tempted to record the video anyway ... for self-evaluation and performance improvement purposes. I guess that I would be happy to sit down and review it with a customer, but I would want to be present to provide explanations for any questions that arise. I am not sure that I would be happy releasing the video into their possession, particularly if there is an outstanding trust issue.
Apr
23
comment Why do we write our specs in different files from our source?
Actually, I like keeping my unit tests in a subdirectory that lives just inside the directory holding my module source code. I also like keeping my spec. documents in another subdirectory alongside, also within the module src dir. Not in the same file though, although now that you mention the idea, I might have to consider it... Nice one!
Apr
14
comment When to separate a project in multiple subprojects
Moderation in all things, as my mother used to say...
Apr
7
comment how to stay efficient when a build is almost always broken
You cannot make an omelette without breaking some eggs.