215 reputation
18
bio website bj.ma
location United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jan 6 at 11:27

Mar
18
comment Is it a good idea to schedule regular time to clean up code?
On a perfect project with perfect management and a team of uniformly great developers this answer would stand. Unfortunately I have never seen or heard of such a project in my ten years in the industry.
Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Oct
5
answered I'm a contract developer and I think I'm about to get screwed
Aug
28
comment Is it efficient to attach a comment on every function?
+1 If the code is written well, and the method small enough then it should be simple enough to understand without a comment that requires ongoing maintenance, and adds noise to the code. Comments are necessary sometimes, but making them mandatory is counter-productive.
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
Great idea, thanks
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
@Thomas For the following reason. Every project that I have worked on that has followed Scrum has been successful on the terms of the business (delivered on time, to spec at a sustainable pace). Every other project I have worked on has resulted in a death march, late delivery and a consumate destruction of trust between developers and the business. Whilst I realise my own 8-year career represents a tiny sample set of projects, these personal experiences carry most weight psychologically and hence my current working hypothesis is that following Scrum is a contributor to a successful project.
Aug
21
comment Should a developer also act as a tester?
"But testing your own code is not a good move" I disagree. Consider unit tests, integration tests and acceptance tests - all can be written by the implementing developer, in collaboration with other stakeholders if need be. Indeed, I perceive an industry move towards more automation of testing and a commensurate reduction in the size of the QA function, with a greater emphasis on the source of the problem - code quality and requirements communication (a process/organisational issue).
Aug
21
comment Why do I need SCRUM vs. a less formal, more lightweight process for my team?
"That's great, but all of it seems like common sense to me. Why did this need codified?" So many innovations seem obvious after the fact. Commercial software development is a relatively new industry that requires a mindset shift in the managers and business leaders that is ongoing to this day. Why has the shift taken so long? The reasons are manifold. If I had to choose one, it would be "human nature". A well-defined Gannt chart gives a warm feeling of certainty (albeit a deceptive one). Being told that you do not actually know what you want at the outset of a project is tough to swallow.
Aug
21
awarded  Critic
Aug
21
comment Why do I need SCRUM vs. a less formal, more lightweight process for my team?
"Personally I think the purpose of SCRUM is to satisfy older organizations where upper management cannot or will not get behind a leaner process". You may think that, but experience has shown me that the Scrum is a set of practices that help deliver software on-time and to a higher quality, whilst retaining agility (ability to respond to changing requirements). Whether these practices help older organizations or companies with waterfall-loving upper management matters not.
Aug
21
comment Why do I need SCRUM vs. a less formal, more lightweight process for my team?
"Believe it or not, good software teams did exist before Scrum came along. Scrum helps the bad ones get better." On the other hand, I would counter that, from the management perspective, they were so rare that your observation is moot.
Aug
21
accepted Who becomes the product owner?
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
*(from above) the "prioritization dilemma" seems to me to be no more than a "misdirection straw-man", with the more likely underlying dilemma being between having a sense of import from having identified reports, and not.
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
Splitting the development effort into five pieces has been duly done. Indeed this seems the obvious naiive solution. Whilst this resolves the prioritisation "dilemma"* for the stream-leads, you are then tying the organisation of the development effort to the number of "requirements streams", which are themselves fairly arbitrary (and often ill-defined). This raises the question "is the development effort's effectiveness affected by its organisation?". I would say it absolutely is. Given this, the pushing of business-level divisions right to the factory floor seems problematic to me.
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
PS: any ideas on how to swing the prevailing wind in the minds of the existing proxy-stakeholders ("stream leaders") towards nomination of a single PO, gratefully received.
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
@Saeed in this context the product owner would actually be the bridge between proxy-stakeholders (the existing stream leaders) and the development team. In trying to avoid having to recruit, the product owner would most likely come from the existing group of proxy-stakeholders, possibly causing prioritization conflicts and problems with authority over the other proxies. I suppose the product owner role could be distributed across all of the proxies as a kludge. I think the only answer is to recruit someone with solid agile PO experience into the new role (which is very unlikely to happen).
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
A product owner role would be "new" in the context described here. Hiring someone new for the role is prohibitively complex from an organisational standpoint. My instinct would be to have the stream leaders self-identify a product owner from amongst themselves, but this would be incredibly difficult as they are all, in effect, in competition for developer resource and will want to retain their own developers (fiefdom/whatever). In my opinion the product owner role is one of the biggest unmentioned challenges in implementing scrum-like process in an organisation.
Aug
21
comment Who becomes the product owner?
@pdr The development team is split according to the requirements streams, with two or two-and-a-half (yes, the "and-a-half" is anathema to my personal organisational philosophy) devs per stream. There is a separate QA team servicing the merged work products. There is no discrete BA function.
Aug
21
awarded  Scholar
Aug
21
comment Tips for achieving “continual” delivery
Chosen as answer for depth of discussion and direct relating of real world experience.