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comment Why would I learn C++11, having known C and C++?
@Shahbaz: I took a glimpse and I don't see anything wrong with C++ closures. C++ has always been a lower-level language than many others that have garbage collections. You seem to have associated the two concepts of closures and memory management into one and as I read your comment, you claim if you have one, you must have the other. What I see is a simply badly written code. C++ gives you tools (like smart pointers) to help you with memory management, but a) you are not using those tools and b) code as written, regardless of closure, mismanages memory.
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comment Overcoming slow problem solving due to increased knowledge of what might go wrong
@Morg - it is unfortunate that every software professional doesn't use exactly the same definition of words and phrases, but such is life. I agree that the way you defined technical debt in your mind, it is more vicious than what I'm describing. But you'll have to agree that between myself, Jeff Atwood and the author of that msdn that Luke posted, and Luke himself, our definition of "techincal debt" is different than yours. $20 loan with 5% interest is still a debt, but if I choose to have extra $20 today, it is my choice to take on that cost, which ain't that severe
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