1,213 reputation
513
bio website madcoderspeak.blogspot.com
location Mumbai, India
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Dec 12 at 2:26

Developer - I like to build things and see them work. Gimme a good book or a game and I can keep myself out of trouble. Got hooked on TDD-XP-Agile around 2005.. trying to get to the promised land since. Work with C Based languages. Play with Ruby.


Jun
22
awarded  Commentator
Jun
22
comment Do you write unit tests for all the time in TDD?
@mcaa - Whatever Steve said + you might set a precedent that it's okay to not write tests. The threshold of what is "interesting enough to test" might keep rising over time... The test above is not much of an effort.. it's hardly 5 lines and in return you get 95%+ peace of mind
Jun
22
comment Do you write unit tests for all the time in TDD?
@Yes - it tests that check() is wired correctly. There should be another test that Service.Check() works once it receives the call. This test looks trivial today but as time goes on someone might add more code to this method (e.g. a guard clause if some-condition return;) and break existing behavior. This test safe-guards against that.
Jun
22
answered Do you write unit tests for all the time in TDD?
Jun
22
answered TDD vs. Productivity
Jun
16
answered How to be better at reviewing code?
Jun
16
comment Should the test and the fix be written by different people?
@Rein - it isn't mandated.. but in general it works better when guided by Acceptance tests.. especially to maturing teams.
Jun
15
revised Should the test and the fix be written by different people?
added 2 characters in body
Jun
15
answered Should the test and the fix be written by different people?
Jun
9
comment Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
I'm not advocating large classes with regions added to mask the smell. Not trying to get religious.. but having a consistent layout within a project speeds up things -- knowing where to look. Grouping bu visibility as the added benefit of having the public API close together so that you can find your specific entry point and drill down from there...
Jun
9
comment Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
@ryanc - the prelude to that paragraph emphasizes that "closely-related/cohesive" concepts should be vertically close together [Prevents scrolling around when you're trying to figure something out]. The called functions are laid out beneath the caller in order of calls. See added code-snippet
Jun
9
awarded  Editor
Jun
9
comment Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
@Neil - I'm trying to judge the merit of the advice.. irrespective of the source. @ John - and the tip is the opposite of forward declarations.. you put the caller first .. the 'callee's are declared just below the callers.
Jun
9
revised Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
updated with code-snippet
Jun
9
comment Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
Yes but that would imply all the public functions should float to the top of the file as one group viz. conventional approach. The proposed approach is different (or at least how I read it).. see update in question
Jun
8
asked Code formatting : Laying out functions based on call hierarchy within a class file?
Jun
8
awarded  Scholar
Jun
8
accepted Are the “practical” chapters at the end of the Siebel's PCL book supposed to be skipped during the first pass?
Jun
2
comment Any tips on getting hired as a software project manager straight out of college?
The answer could just be that "you need to spend some time on the shop-floor" before you work your way up. If you're good, you should bubble real quick because there will be proof (as opposed to 'trust me and my creds')
Jun
2
answered What personal process can I employ at a non-software based company?