150 reputation
6
bio website springinpractice.com
location Sammamish, WA
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen Jul 9 at 16:30

Hi, I'm Willie Wheeler, and I'm a Principal Applications Engineer for a leading provider of online travel services. I have 17 years of professional software development experience, mostly around web application development using Java, JEE and Spring.

With Joshua White, I wrote the book Spring in Practice, for Manning Publications.

I run the Spring in Practice blog, which has technical articles about Java, JEE, Spring, IT management, usability and some other related topics.

Finally, I also run the new Zkybase blog on devops.


Jun
18
comment Why do so many hashed and encrypted strings end in an equals sign?
Yeah, I finally realized what is going on. I looked in my SSH public and private key files and noticed that they also have the =/== endings. These are base64 encodings of byte arrays, like BrianS and zespri describe. Thanks guys.
Jun
17
comment Why do so many hashed and encrypted strings end in an equals sign?
The OP says that the he stores the hash and it ends with equals signs. That suggests that he's confusing hashing with Base64 encoding. If the point is that it's fine to base64 encode a hash, then of course, but what does that have to do with anything?
Jun
17
comment Why do so many hashed and encrypted strings end in an equals sign?
@BrianS In general people hash and salt passwords for security purposes. Base64 provides no security since it's reversible using a standard algorithm with no secret.
Jun
17
comment Why do so many hashed and encrypted strings end in an equals sign?
If you're "hashing" via Base64, that's not a hash alg at all. It's fully and easily reversible. (Maybe there are hash algs that pad with equals signs. Not sure.)
Apr
3
comment Zero behavior objects in OOP - my design dilemma
Martin Fowler and Eric Evans, among others. martinfowler.com/bliki/AnemicDomainModel.html
Sep
21
awarded  Editor
Sep
21
revised Supporting multitenancy
Added another article.
Oct
2
awarded  Critic
Jan
29
answered Supporting multitenancy
Sep
25
comment Supporting multitenancy
This is a helpful distinction you guys are making around customizability. I think the same concept might apply toward manageability too. Our multitenancy probably aims at relatively fewer larger customers rather than long-tail customers. If the main purpose for multitenancy is to capture long-tail then it may not even be the right approach for us. Thanks for these reflections.
Sep
23
awarded  Scholar
Sep
23
accepted Supporting multitenancy
Sep
22
comment Supporting multitenancy
Probably from a design perspective this is the easiest, but from an administrative perspective it doesn't seem to be. At least our sysadmins are not very excited about this proposal. (And yeah, we're using VMs.) Way more instances to manage (monitoring, deployment, etc.) We are in fact looking at ways to make this more manageable to get some physical isolation here but on the face of it, this approach seems to trade dev simplicity for admin simplicity...?
Sep
21
awarded  Student
Sep
16
asked Supporting multitenancy
Mar
30
comment Refactoring: Isn't it just a fancy word for clean up your code?
Sure, I can buy that. Test discipline is more about how one goes about performing the refactoring, but it isn't inherent in the definition. (I.e. I can refactor code without any tests at all.) I don't know if I can agree that refactoring isn't a methodology--there are whole books written with step-by-step patterns and so forth.
Mar
30
comment Refactoring: Isn't it just a fancy word for clean up your code?
I'm not saying that it's a good/safe/desirable to make major changes without test discipline. I'm saying that refactoring as a methodology involves test discipline, whereas "cleaning things up" isn't a methodology at all.
Mar
25
awarded  Teacher
Mar
25
awarded  Supporter
Mar
25
answered Refactoring: Isn't it just a fancy word for clean up your code?