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 Yearling
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Apr
5
answered Github Parent commit committed after child commit?
Apr
5
comment Github Parent commit committed after child commit?
Occam's Razor says the more likely cause is that the computers used to create these commits had clocks that were out of sync. Not everybody uses NTP.
Apr
3
comment Why is XML called a “language” exactly?
On what do you base your requirement that a language has to "do" something? I don't see that in any of the definitions at dictionary.com.
Mar
29
comment Flow control in Go without a for loop
One alternative in Go is to use channels and goroutines, although that's not something that I'd expect from someone that has "never touched Go before this point." Was this an interview question?
Mar
25
awarded  Yearling
Mar
11
comment Laissez faire memory management
Or their reaction might be more dramatic: in a previous job, we regularly ran Purify (an equivalent checker) on our product. Along the way we discovered some runtime leaks. Oracle was happy when we reported leaks in their library. But another division of our company, which produced a messaging product, responded by saying "you have no right to be looking at that code."
Mar
11
comment Laissez faire memory management
You might want to edit your question to be more clear that Valgrind checks for leaks in the runtime itself, rather than application-level resources that are subject to garbage collection. Although to be honest, I don't think this question is answerable without a maintainer coming here and saying "we've never run Valgrind on our code, so we have no clue what leaks might be in it."
Feb
22
answered Recieving errors without engaging in excessive communication when using sockets
Feb
22
comment Recieving errors without engaging in excessive communication when using sockets
As a general comment, you're probably prematurely optimizing. To give a more detailed comment, we'd need to know your protocol details. Starting with: does the client expect a response? and how does the server know when it's at the end of a batch?
Feb
14
comment How did version control work on microcomputers of the day in the 80s and 90s?
@gnat - are you talking about the same SCCS? I know that I used it on a Next in the mid-90s, and believe that I used it on various non-Solaris Unices in the late 80s. And the linked Wikipedia article would seem to agree that it wasn't Solaris-only.
Jan
31
comment Compiler design prevent register override
Here's what you said above: "it can store temporary result is RAM". What aren't you doing?
Jan
31
comment Compiler design prevent register override
Here's a hint: you can only emit bytecode for an operation after you've emitted bycode for the operations that it depends on. Therefore, you should emit all bytecode for the addition before you emit any bytecode for the multiplication. This will turn into a depth-first traversal of your "object representation," where bytecode for the node is emitted after bytecode for both of its child nodes.
Jan
31
comment Compiler design prevent register override
Your real problem appears to be an incorrectly constructed parse tree. Or perhaps your visitor should be prepending operations (assuming a top-down traversal). In either case, Stack Overflow would probably be a better place to post, but you'd need to show your code and how the particular expression transforms into a parse tree.
Jan
16
comment Why does Scala name monadic composition as “for comprehension”?
Perhaps they took the construct from Erlang or Python, where it operates on sequences, and only later said "you know, monadic operations can look a lot like sequences if you squint."
Jan
13
comment Using ClearCase file revision system for a multiple teams for a single file
Is this file being modified by all those people? If yes, then you have a communications problem not a technology problem. If no, then the config spec should be set up to select the main branch version.
Dec
27
comment Python's join seems to focus not on the items to join, but on the symbol, as compared to Ruby or Smalltalk, for a design reason?
In one form, the collection knows how to convert itself to a string with a delimiter, in the other a string knows how to concatenate a collection using itself as a delimiter. They're both object-oriented, but change the subject and object of the verb.
Dec
27
comment Python's join seems to focus not on the items to join, but on the symbol, as compared to Ruby or Smalltalk, for a design reason?
From The Zen of Python: "There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it. Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch."
Dec
22
awarded  Pundit
Dec
18
answered Why does inner class have to specify Outer.this.remove(int)?
Dec
17
comment Why does inner class have to specify Outer.this.remove(int)?
Have you actually tried removing the Outer.this reference? What error message do you get when compiling?