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location Pennsylvania
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seen Apr 11 at 15:13

Moderator Pro Tem on Parenting.Stackexchange.com.

Web developer, business analyst, project manager, and proud father.

profile for Beofett on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


Jul
31
comment How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
@Mark - my apologies. I intended to focus more on the angle of finding the dividing line between web development (programming) and web design (not programming), but in retrospect I clearly failed. Do you think a (major) revision focusing more on that might make this a salvageable question?
Jul
30
comment How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
Perhaps "whenever practical" would have been a better choice of words. I don't think over engineering is going to be an issue, although it is fair to point out that potential hazard. I do try to solicit his opinion and treat him as an expert whenever possible, but you make good points about his possible perception of the situation. Ironically, I have repeatedly felt that he was trying to exert control over how I do my work (constantly asking what I'm working on, etc.), when it may just be backlash from him feeling the same way.
Jul
30
comment How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
I think that's a pretty good assessment of the situation. However, the role was created specifically because he realized that there was no way he could do all these things, both due to lack of knowledge, and lack of time due to all of his other graphic design responsibilities (which are many, and which he does well). I do repeatedly emphasize that my goal is to look at the long-term, and plan to make maintenance and changes in the future much easier for us both.
Jul
30
comment How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
And yes, I do discuss the process improvements with him before going to management. It is both during these discussions, and after receiving management approval, that I have to explain and justify every decision.
Jul
30
comment How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
Yes, we do report to the same manager. I have been asked by management to define several processes and policies after I started producing requirements documents and project charters. However, the processes he is mostly questioning are things like "we need source control" and "we should review changes instead of just implementing everything requested as-is (requests can come in from literally anyone in the company)".
Jul
30
asked How do you handle a graphic designer who thinks he's a web designer?
Jul
21
comment Laptops or Notebooks in a meeting?
I generally agree, however, there is a definite exception in my book. Most times it is beneficial to have someone documenting the discussion, issues, and outcomes from the meeting. In this case, having a single designated person taking meeting minutes on a laptop absolutely makes sense.
Jul
8
comment Anti Identity Column
+1 for the race condition. This occurs far more frequently than might be expected, particularly in a web environment, and can be a nightmare to correct once it becomes an issue.
Jul
6
answered Are there drawbacks to taking a job where I will be using a unique programming language?
Jul
6
comment Should experienced programmers know database queries?
+1. While some specific jobs don't require RDBMS skills, or even any database skills, there are many, many jobs out there that do require those skills. Saying "I don't need them in my current job, so saying they should be part of a developer's skillset" seems awfully short-sighted.
Jun
29
awarded  Populist
Jun
23
comment How to improve relationships between consultants and staff programmers
@Catchops Thanks for the kind words. It's hard to compete with such awesome use of a classic pop-culture catch phrase coupled with succinct and outstanding advice. I'd +2 Steven's answer if I could :) I'm glad you got helpful answers to your question, and I wish you the best of luck. Its a shame more consultants don't place value on the goals you are trying to accomplish. It is good to know there are honest consultants out there, and hopefully just by asking these questions, you have helped to remove some of the negative associations many IT staff and programmers have.
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
20
comment How to improve relationships between consultants and staff programmers
@maple_shaft There are also consultants who just assume that everyone in-house is incompetent, and try to do everything from scratch. I don't think it is accurate to claim every decent consulting company pays enough attention to reassuring the in-house teams (I don't think its safe to assume every consultant is either excellent or horrible, with no middle ground, either). The OP was asking for what could be done to improve things. If the only options are "either you're already good, in which case you're perfect, or you suck and can't become good", then there's not much point in answering.
Jun
20
answered How to improve relationships between consultants and staff programmers
Jun
1
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Nemeth - "We can say that it is a possibility that he is overestimating his work, but not probable." I might dispute your comment about whether or not it is probable that an entry level programmer did 80% of the work on a major project over a 5 month period, but I don't really need to, as I never claimed it was probable. Thus my use of the phrase "you might be overestimating your contribution".
Jun
1
awarded  Good Answer
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Tuzo As I said earlier, I have my misgivings about that research :) From what I've read so far, the book does acknowledge that some types of praise can be helpful, but others harmful. I'm of the mind that a pat on the head, no matter how well phrased, isn't as good as a raise or a bonus, but it still beats a poke in the eye with a sharp stick :D
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Tuzo The study I linked just happened to be the first on the topic that I could find. The book I cited (which I am currently reading) has a host of arguments against praise, even if it is relevant to the task. Some of the points that might be relevant: praise of performance leads to anxiety to maintain equally high performance standards for future projects; praise may be interpreted as condescending; praise may be distracting, and may divert focus from the task at hand to the praise. IMO the first example is very relevant (think "oh, no, now they'll want me to work weekends EVERY project!").
May
31
awarded  Nice Answer