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Moderator Pro Tem on Parenting.Stackexchange.com.

Web developer, business analyst, project manager, and proud father.

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May
31
awarded  Editor
May
31
revised What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
added 40 characters in body
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Steven - Thanks :) If you're interested in reading more about this, check out amazon.com/Punished-Rewards-Trouble-Incentive-Praise/dp/…. The author cites many other references for this idea; some good, some questionable. I really dislike the book, since the author uses some very questionable logic and manipulation of data, which is why I said I don't necessarily agree, but many people seem to buy into it.
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Jon - Oh, I know it happens. Been there :) However, as you said, it isn't frequent, and it can be very easy to overestimate the contribution of code if you are new and not exposed to the work that goes on behind the scenes to scope and define the project (if, in fact, that work is actually being done!).
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Steven A. Lowe - I was strictly speaking of praise in regards to concrete benefits. As for your puppy example, studies have shown that while people respond better after getting a pat on the head, actual performance may decrease with praise: mendeley.com/research/… " In conclusion, praise appears to increase effort, but it may impair skilled performance. " I don't necessarily agree that this means supervisors shouldn't praise effort, but it could possibly explain the lack.
May
31
comment What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
@Jeff O - Absolutely. However, "Great work!" and a pat on the head doesn't buy you much. Of course, busting your *** and feeling like no one notices sucks. In some corporate cultures, though, the "Great work, thanks for all the extra time" sometimes is slow to trickle down to the entry level positions, especially if the immediate supervisor isn't particularly good. Chances are that someone will notice sooner or later, though, depending on how much patience the employee has to stick it out.
May
31
answered What's your suggestion if the company didn't recognize my contribution towards a big project?
May
23
comment Can non-technical staff gather requirements on behalf of the development team?
A proxy between the developer and the business can work, but only if the proxy is trained and knowledgeable enough to know what to ask. Relying on someone who simply knows the customer's needs is a recipe for failure if they don't know how to translate those needs into technical specifications that reach the level of detail required for development.
May
22
awarded  Nice Answer
May
19
comment Advice and resources on collaborative environments
"your question(s!) are extremely broad, with very little background", "Could you be more specific on why you can't follow an open source project to learn what is already widely-practiced?" and "it would have been great if your rather vague question had links to the things you already know making it possible to explain these concepts in more detail without providing useless background that you already were well aware of" are all examples of people providing you advice on how to improve the question. Yet you did not provide more context, narrow the focus, or do anything other than complain.
May
19
comment Advice and resources on collaborative environments
Sorry, but I don't see any evidence of you "getting pelted for asking a question". Your question(s!) are extremely broad, with very little background. Getting down voted is not the same as getting pelted. It is an indication that your question is not well formed by community standards, making it difficult to provide you with a useful answer.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
@David I agree, and understand that sometimes overdressing can make a negative impression, however, this specific answer claims that people may assume you are "a moron overdressing to hide your incompetence," which is quite a bit different than being "taken less seriously." Regardless, I still believe it is far safer to overdress than underdress, and even those who view overdressing negatively will still understand that it is a non-standard expectation, and are therefore more likely to make allowances.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
I'd say it is more accurate to say "it is only nonstandard in most regions and industries". Silicon Valley does have a reputation as being its own distinct culture.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
@nohat Sorry, but I don't believe "my answer is right" is a valid argument. In some environments you absolutely can run into the situation of "if you have to ask..." creating an initial negative impression. For example, if you were called by a HR rep from an East Coast bank for a programming position, and you said "great, what should I wear?" chances are very good that the person you spoke with will immediately get a negative impression of you.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
Upon further consideration, you are describing a situation where, essentially, the people hiring are playing a game of "we have non-standard expectations during the hiring process, and anyone does not anticipate those non-standard expectations is to be derided, even though we offer no warning or clues." They apparently consider it critical to the position that either the applicant either asks what to wear, or just doesn't care about appearing "professional". Either way, I think it is a very rare applicant who would be happy working for such people.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
Even if you are going to work with people who look down on "suit wearers", you cannot guarantee that those people will be the only people interviewing you. Frequently HR reps play a part in the interview process, and they are certainly the types who would be predisposed to look down upon "underdressed" applicants.
May
18
comment Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
@nohat I have never encountered such a situation. Attire for the interview is not assumed to be attire for day-to-day work. Additionally, if the candidate has not yet interviewed for the position, how would they know what the normal dress code is? It is not generally good practice to ask what the daily dress code is when called for an interview (you are more likely to get away with "what is the dress style for the interview?", although this still runs the risk of creating a negative impression should the person believe strongly in "always formal for interviews").
May
18
answered Do you dress formally or casually for a programming interview?
Apr
13
answered Coaxing requirements out of business people?
Apr
12
awarded  Good Answer