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awarded  Famous Question
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Apr
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comment Has there been any formal proof that documentation in general is incomplete and obsolete to a certain grade?
@Ramhound operations, i.e. sysadmins
Apr
1
comment Has there been any formal proof that documentation in general is incomplete and obsolete to a certain grade?
A small clarification: the documentation in question is just a prelude to the question, i.e. we try to work with the ops to make a sensible delivery, so there is no real problem in handling the situation (apart from having to at all). I just wondered whether there is something scientific we could refer to by name.
Apr
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asked Has there been any formal proof that documentation in general is incomplete and obsolete to a certain grade?
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Nov
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answered What are the most popular IDEs per language?
Nov
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comment Is the GoF book still the one to read?
@user5396: depends a bit on people's training, since if they are trained to a Java mindset, they'd probably be less productive with e.g. Python, producing anti-pythonical solutions. I don't fully understand what you've meant by "super control of algorithm", but there should be no controlling problems with either programming language.
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Nov
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comment Is the GoF book still the one to read?
@user5396: A classic one is by Peter Norvig: norvig.com/design-patterns, which is by the way 12 years old. According to him, 16 of 23 patterns in the GoF book are much simpler in dynamic languages. I would recommend reading Practical Common Lisp (available at gigamonkeys.com/book) and maybe Higher Order Perl (hop.perl.plover.com) to see what a proper dynamic language is capable of.
Oct
29
answered Is the GoF book still the one to read?