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 Yearling
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  • 48 votes cast
Jun
13
comment Why do programs use call stacks, if nested function calls can be inlined?
@MSalters: Well they do call it a dynamic linker. But what I meant was that if you want to do these kinds of optimizations, you have to give up dynamic linking as we know it, or at least avoid dynamic linking the parts of your program where the optimizations need to happen.
Jun
12
comment Why do programs use call stacks, if nested function calls can be inlined?
@MSalters: LTO completely precludes any meaningful form of dynamic linking - you can't have shareable code pages, or reasonable program start times, if you're deferring final code generation to load time.
Mar
4
awarded  Yearling
Mar
4
answered Releasing open source software too soon
Mar
4
comment Releasing open source software too soon
It sounds like your only big mistake was calling it "v1.0". Generally users expect that to indicate a "finished" product in the sense that it's usable for its purported purpose, free of obvious bugs, etc. "Release early" is good, but users should be informed that they're guinea pigs.
Mar
2
comment Which version of Java should I use for a desktop application to reach the most users?
@RichardTingle: No. While the browser plugin is the single biggest risk and can be disabled, there are plenty of additional risks like the possibility of bundled malware being installed when the auto-update runs and the possibility of the browser plugin being accidentally enabled (when upgrading or otherwise).
Mar
1
comment Which version of Java should I use for a desktop application to reach the most users?
Being that best practices for security are to consider having Java installed an unacceptable risk, I think the only reasonable answer is "none at all".
Feb
25
awarded  Editor
Feb
25
revised Is it reasonable to assume that any physical quantity can be represented by a 64-bit integer without overflow or underflow?
added 319 characters in body
Feb
24
answered Is it reasonable to assume that any physical quantity can be represented by a 64-bit integer without overflow or underflow?
Feb
3
comment Is a 1 < 10 comparison less expensive than 1 < 1000000?
In snippet 1, the controlling expression for the if statement is always-true, so it compiles (on any proper optimizing compiler) to no code at all.
Dec
16
comment Is there any algorithm pattern to protect any content in the web to ensure I am the first one who created it?
@congusbongus: That's an irrelevant detail since having P and the ciphertext gives you the plaintext, with which you can construct a new S', P', and new ciphertext that decrypts (with P') to the same plaintext.
Dec
16
comment Is there any algorithm pattern to protect any content in the web to ensure I am the first one who created it?
@congusbongus: Like I said, the attacker can easily publish the same plaintext with a different P, and it's impossible for an observer to determine who is the original author of the plaintext and who is the attacker who copied it without trusting a third-party timestamp. The cryptography here is purely security theater.
Dec
16
comment Is there any algorithm pattern to protect any content in the web to ensure I am the first one who created it?
@congusbongus: Doing that is not necessary to mount an attack, because as the attacker you can change P.
Dec
15
comment Is there any algorithm pattern to protect any content in the web to ensure I am the first one who created it?
@Paul: But then the encryption is irrelevant. It's equivalent to just posting your plaintext content and relying on the date.
Dec
15
comment Is there any algorithm pattern to protect any content in the web to ensure I am the first one who created it?
How does this help? Anyone who can decrypt cipher can just republish the same way with their own secret key and you have no way of proving which party published first and which copied from the other without trusting some third-party record of publication time.
Sep
27
comment Is there a good reason to make pure functions non-public?
Foo Create(){ return new Foo(); } can never be pure since it can throw an exception if the allocation fails.
Aug
30
comment What specifically does expressive power refer to?
It should be noted that limiting a program to at most 100 million variables in a given scope imposes some limit on expressiveness. It might make it impossible to implement Firefox, for instance. ;-)
Aug
29
comment Are C static libraries frowned upon?
This is true (speeding up development), but it's really frustrating that it makes it into production. The canonical example is Firefox. The amount of engineering effort (in the form of hideous hacks) that have gone into speeding up dynamic linking symbol resolution so that Firefox loads in reasonable time is utterly crazy. Much better performance could have been attained with much less engineering cost if they were just willing to static-link all of their in-project code (while still dynamic linking system libraries and plugins, if desired).
Aug
15
comment Why can't we use IP address instead of cookies in identifying the client in servlets?
@dirkk: Please don't accuse me of being wrong about something you have no idea about. As Bob suspected, I was talking about wifi. I have access to 8+ cafes and other business access points, plus (lower-quality) city-provided wifi access points along the street, and my phone regularly jumps between them while walking.