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seen Jul 4 at 7:34

May
22
comment I'm doing 90% maintenance and 10% development, is this normal?
Love this answer. "The Project From Hell" this is so true "Welcome to real-life industrial software engineering!" I have never worked on a significant project anywhere, be it public sector, corporate, or start-up that was not already a mess. Save one, and I would describe that as a shock.
Dec
20
comment Selecting the (right?) application design
@amon yes agreed, it is really all a case of managing expectations. An extensible back-end, with reduced features, will normally serve better than a shoddy back-end with lots of features. Good use of the 80/20 rule could help trim requirements, and you could hit some middle ground between the two possible outputs.
Nov
11
comment Why is Zend Framework so complicated?
+1 My significant reason for not seriously considering the uptake of ZF / ZF2 has to be the ugly, auto complete / hinting and inteli-sense dodging nested array based configurations. It infringes my personal dislike of the overuse of arrays in an OO world.
Oct
21
comment Is functional intellisense and code browsing more beneficial than the use of dependency injection containers
Correct about the interfaces, that is what is happening in some cases, it all depends on who writes the code and if / how 'they' decorate it with the type comment. So I think I am going to go with a typed container solution (specific container for specific interface) so that intellisense works implicitly as you state from Interface level, but implicitly without the extra 'type' comments. I am no stranger to the benefits of static typing, but I don't think my suggestion to redevelop the system in Java would be well received, by the execs or the PHP team :)
Oct
21
comment Is functional intellisense and code browsing more beneficial than the use of dependency injection containers
Excellent explanation. Having read your final paragraph I have a picture forming in my head of typed containers. This is likely a fair trade-off, the coupling is indirect and a good block of intellisense will be available implicitly.
Oct
20
comment Can an internally developed fast evolving, agile, short sprint web application lend itself to offshoring?
I can see a solution in here, interestingly, it may make off-shoring less of a cost incentive. Thanks for your input. Appreciated.
Oct
19
comment Can an internally developed fast evolving, agile, short sprint web application lend itself to offshoring?
Are the remote team invited into your process (planning, backlog, quality control, deployment etc), perhaps represented by the local lead, or do you allow them to work their own process?
Oct
18
comment Can an internally developed fast evolving, agile, short sprint web application lend itself to offshoring?
@oded That is my fear, so it then raises a huge question, should I change the way our team works to reach off-shore readiness? I doubt the off-shore benefits are worth it.
Oct
18
comment What are programmers made to do in spare time in jobs?
I have a 1 year backlog, but we still have slack and it is essential to minimise pressure, and grow innovation. In fact some of our greatest developments were conceived over a beer! Go figure!
Oct
16
comment Should you promise to deliver a feature that you aren't sure if its implementable?
A little honesty is good. 'It needs investigation' is a good response. Time and materials contracts are perfect for this (Happy to give it a go at your cost), fixed cost, be very careful what you agree to that is not nailed down. I still have nightmares of a complex customisation to TCPDF / FPDI with PDF embeded font extraction and reuse. The client had 'defined' as part of the solution that it must be written in PHP, and that it must be cross platform. I did that on a fixed contract, that was a mistake.
Oct
14
comment Would Using a PHP Framework Be Beneficial in My Context?
+1 almost-zero configuration framework. Very good answer.
Oct
14
comment Is it unusual for a small company (15 developers) not to use managed source/version control?
We have a third of that resource, and have a significant investment in isolated development environments/servers, source control and continuous integration. I am glad you are winning your case! Software development can be hard enough without the deployment getting confused.
Oct
13
comment How do you disarm a cowboy coder?
Poison his coffee
Oct
13
comment Understanding the levels of computing
I would +2 if I could. great answer.
Oct
13
comment Understanding the levels of computing
Back in the days of dos, using assembly language for VGA graphics routines was about the only way to get any performance but I suppose I did not know what I was doing! But in the last 10 years or more of my career I have not had to look at anything so low. And I am now mostly ignorant to what happens at those levels. Rarely I even need to allocate or clean up my own memory. I suspect many in my team don't know what a stack is! In many ways it is not productive to code at such a level, reinventing the wheel so to speak. Rather we stand on the shoulders of giants.
Oct
13
comment Responding to end users about bugs they found
Interesting. We struggle with 4. But we have a complication because we have a partner ->* customer structure, and we inform the partner who informs their customers. This means that we give the partner quite an informed status including priority, and of course, they have their own view, and often question the priority we have given, and in comes the micro management especially if they have significant connections with the executives. I have come to thinking that less information is best.
Oct
13
comment How to start competitive programming?
Don't underestimate the value of collaborative programming either. We have seen some problems in our team due to over competitiveness - over engineering / interpersonal issues. So competitive programming could help you, but so could taking part in an open source project, or developing a project with like minded friends.
Oct
13
comment Predicting advantages of database denormalization
Good question. interested myself. I find that in areas that we have over normalised our database, we end up with a few too many complex views that help us denormalise, and potentially a lot of indexes.