263 reputation
211
bio website usefulhowto.blogspot.com
location Ireland
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Oct 9 at 12:43

IT Nerd: c#/asp.net team lead/developer/Scrum Master (to all the scrum purists: I know, I know.)

Working with mixed onshore/offshore teams.

Gamer GMing Call Of Cthulhu/Feng Shui/Pendragon/Shadowrun Currently player of D&D/Traveller (but I'll play pretty much anything)

Love me some boardgames too.


Feb
19
awarded  Nice Question
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5
awarded  Popular Question
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4
awarded  Constituent
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awarded  Caucus
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5
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
suggested suggested edit on Is it ok to write a quick software programme and then refactor it?
Oct
24
awarded  Commentator
Oct
24
comment Why do I have to choose between “management” and “technical” tracks in my career?
Don't get me wrong I agree with your basic point, but I don't think its quite as black and white as all that. I agree a Project Manager is unlikely to be the best person to fix problems with your application's Messaging architecture, his time is better spend maintaining the budget and managing scope. But, I think it's perfectly reasonable for a Team lead to spend time writing code AND time discussing scope with the client.
Oct
24
comment Why do I have to choose between “management” and “technical” tracks in my career?
@Permas you may be right but In relation to software development I'm not entirely sure what kind of tasks you mean?
Oct
24
comment Why do I have to choose between “management” and “technical” tracks in my career?
I think this analogy stretches things a bit. Requirements gathering,architecture,coding,customer contact,staff management are all parts of the same 'chain'. Knowing in depth what happens in each link ulimately helps you deliver better outputs from each 'link'. whereas the cooking process has no direct link to the coding process (barring serving spoiled food to make all your developers ill!)
Oct
24
comment Why do I have to choose between “management” and “technical” tracks in my career?
"what most people enjoy doing most is often not what they are best at" I'd expect this to be false more often then not. If you really enjoy something its probably because you are good at it. Now if you said that what people WANT to do most is not necessarily what they are good at, I'd agree. I've seen plenty of technical folks who want to be managers (because of salary) and just aren't cut out for it.
Oct
20
comment How do you respond to a request for 'emergency contact information' for when you are on vacation?
Heck, parts of Ireland (my home country, so I know of which I speak) have zero coverage.
Oct
19
comment Why do some teachers often consider bad practice things that are not?
Yep totally agree happens to everyone, only reason teachers are singled out is that their primary role is to, well, teach, whereas software devs main job is to produce a product (there's usually an element of mentoring/educating alongside but it is secondary). I have no doubt this phenomena occurs in other fields too, its just going to happen more in computing/IT related fields as the rate of change of 'best practice' is much higher than other fields.
Oct
6
revised What is the definition of Time on Task?
removed repetitive 'basically' lazy writing
Oct
6
answered What is the definition of Time on Task?
Oct
6
comment What is the definition of Time on Task?
..what @Péter said.
Oct
6
comment What is the definition of Time on Task?
People get sidetracked all the time. desktop software upgrades, assisting other team members, administration work, emails etc..etc.. All that stuff has to be done but its very likely not within the scope of your tasks.
Oct
6
awarded  Analytical
Oct
5
awarded  Scholar
Oct
5
accepted How to handle 'external' dependencies in scrum?