672 reputation
59
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/13760/…
location New Zealand
age 38
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 2 days ago

A C++, DSP, Linux, Audio Guy.


Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Feb
26
awarded  Constituent
Feb
25
awarded  Caucus
Feb
13
comment Source code metrics for measuring code stability?
Lemme guess. The soundtrack was the looped Harlem Shuffle ;)
Feb
13
revised Source code metrics for measuring code stability?
added 47 characters in body
Feb
13
revised Source code metrics for measuring code stability?
added 119 characters in body
Feb
13
comment Source code metrics for measuring code stability?
@RonU : You can use gource to visualize the state of the repository in a custom time range. The point of it is that it visualizes activity on your code base over time. How easy the information is to interpret depends on a lot of factors, like I have explained in my answer above. Yes, it is an amazing tool if you want the "big picture", so I think that deserves a +1 ;)
Feb
11
revised Good platform to teach Programming 101?
added 615 characters in body
Feb
11
answered Source code metrics for measuring code stability?
Feb
11
comment Good platform to teach Programming 101?
Here you go. 3 Lines : stackoverflow.com/questions/307305/play-a-sound-with-python
Feb
10
revised Good platform to teach Programming 101?
added 199 characters in body
Feb
10
answered Good platform to teach Programming 101?
Nov
19
comment What does SVN do better than Git?
As of git version 1.8.0, you can now use the git subtree command to accomplish exactly this. Last subversion advantage bites the dust :) Details here: github.com/gitster/git/blob/… Note: Even though this is a link to a github project, git-subtree is now part of the core git distribution.
Oct
21
awarded  Announcer
Oct
14
awarded  Good Answer
Sep
27
accepted How do I know if a particular build has a particular version control change in it?
Sep
25
asked How do I know if a particular build has a particular version control change in it?
Sep
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
23
comment Torvalds' quote about good programmer
I'd also like to add that bad data structures usually cause bad code, because over time, all that remains is the question "why was it designed this way?" and tacked on top of it are several half hearted attempts to fix the design. These attempts are also usually aborted out of fear because the "fix" inevitably comes down to "breaking" the way it currently works.