20,008 reputation
14077
bio website thehungersite.com
location United Kingdom
age 45
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 19 hours ago
experienced software engineer with many years in the industry, mostly c++ for large-scale, high-reliability systems.

Aug
14
answered Estimation of space is required to store 275305224 of 5x5 MagicSquares?
Aug
14
comment Have enterprises adopted pure FP to create desktop user interfaces? Examples?
@MarioT.Lanza Job postings.... right, the ones that say "we do cool stuff, please come work for us", and when you accept you find they "intend" to do the cool stuff, but first there's some core VB6 code that needs maintenance...
Aug
12
comment Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
@TorbenGundtofte-Bruun I prefer a feature-branch approach, branch off trunk, make changes, then merge back onto trunk when its done, reviewed, tested etc. This can be a problem if you leave branches lying around for a long time - only create a feature branch if you intend to merge it onto trunk! The advantage is that it allows devs to work independently, without affecting others - you might ave problem when merging, but generally such problems are rare and easily fixed anyway (ie 2 devs change the same thing). Don't be afraid of branches or merging.
Aug
12
comment Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
@TorbenGundtofte-Bruun if that's the way you want to do it, that's fine. Bugfixing on trunk allows you to get the bug fix right (as it is unstable itself until proven) and then the final, proven good bugfix is merged. If you;ve ever had a bugfix that took several iterations to get right then you realise why you don't want to make bugfixes directly on Release. You create an unstable release branch temporarily. Its safer to make changes elsewhere and merge when reviewed, tested etc. You could make a branch from release for these if you prefer though.
Aug
12
comment Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
@TorbenGundtofte-Bruun well, if trunk is unstable, is it "considered unsafe to merge from an unstable codeline into a stable codeline" (to quote yourself) when making release branches from trunk. You must trust trunk enough to create a release in the first place, just use the same testing you do on a release to ensure its fit.
Aug
12
comment Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
@TorbenGundtofte-Bruun trunk is stable, surely. Releases are based off it, therefore it must be stable or all your codelines will be unstable.
Aug
12
answered Distributed game development and security of source code
Aug
10
answered When running PHPUnit tests - is it common to use a separate database for testing?
Aug
8
comment Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
@TorbenGundtofte-Bruun sometimes we do, but for some components that never change (eg the openssl bugfix of a few months ago), the same patch could be applied to them all. Generally we don't need to as we only work on the "current release" except for critical, one-off patches.
Aug
8
comment Teaching software concepts: formal definition is a necessary evil?
now you understand what the MoT requirement for tyres is, explain it to me. I think you'll find that you'll come up with words pretty much the same as that citation in your driving test.
Aug
8
answered Managing 'done' but not releasable code in TFS
Aug
8
comment Managing 'done' but not releasable code in TFS
they have a truly shit branching strategy - "everyone works on trunk" and if they don't finish their work, it gets "backed out". WTF?!
Aug
8
answered Develop in trunk and then branch off, or in release branch and then merge back?
Aug
7
comment Why are deadlines always so short?
true, never underestimate the desire of developers to gold-plate and refactor everything, or.. rewrite it all of course. The OP already mentions this as "understand the basic principles of OOP", "refactor", "bad code", "tests", "technology considered recent in 2006". Sigh.
Aug
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
6
comment Quantifying the advantages of a modern version control system
If they have a dedicated release department, they almost certainly don't give a fig about any "faster, more agile teams". They probably don;t care about developer productivity either. They will care about reliability, traceability of changes, and control of what ends up in the release.
Aug
6
comment Quantifying the advantages of a modern version control system
@kdgregory and they will pounce on the "you can checkin without it going to the server, what if your PC crashes, you'll lose all your checkins. Where's the backups? how do we control a single stream of the sources to build each release from?"
Aug
6
answered Is it faster to query using linq-to-entities or a data adapter?
Aug
6
comment Quantifying the advantages of a modern version control system
@JanHudec I recall Clearcase... it wasn't that slow where I worked but maybe its one of those products where the repo gets put on a server in a distant corporate datacentre surrounded by many layers of security and routing. I think the OP would have a better chance with SVN or TFS than git, but its not what he's set his heart on.
Aug
6
comment Quantifying the advantages of a modern version control system
@JanHudec sort-of true. I worked with Doors, for example, awful product.. until we used an alternative , then we realised what Doors gave us and figured it was more of a usability issue. IBM has good tools that do good stuff, but look dreadful.