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Jul
20
awarded  web-development
Jul
20
answered How to compute flow rate of web traffic?
Jul
16
comment Isn't there a substantial problem with SVN tags?
the Linux kernel tar.bz2 is about 100Mb... teeny. If I took the enterprise I mentioned and checked out the entire repo, it would be 30Gb on local disk, and that only counted the UK repo, not the American, European or Australian ones. Anyway, the tool is only inappropriate if you use it in the wrong circumstances instead of using the right tool. Remember, they're all just tools.
Jul
16
comment Isn't there a substantial problem with SVN tags?
@BasileStarynkevitch svn tags are cheap too, the difference is that git stores them in a "stacked" organisation, whereas svn stores them in a "flattened" organisation. With git you get all the history, whereas svn only gets you the last revision. Switching branches in git is quick but at a cost of increased disk space, switching in SVN is slow but uses less disk. Its all trade-offs depending what your requirements are, neither is "good or bad", just different. Enterprise I worked at had a 5Gb repo, git would not have worked well with that, but it works very well with small OSS projects, etc.
Jul
16
comment How to break TFS or Mercurial repository in some way with a bad commit?
AFAIK no other SCM allows rewriting of history - every commit is a stored commit, no matter what. Git is the exception allowing things like rebase and fastforward which should have no place in any SCM. Other than that, there might be bugs in various products that allows damage to occur, or a dedicated attacker could damage the repo but these are bugs that occur in all software.
Jul
16
revised Isn't there a substantial problem with SVN tags?
added 140 characters in body
Jul
16
answered Isn't there a substantial problem with SVN tags?
Jul
16
answered How to handle OSS license on GitHub with non-OSS pictures
Jul
16
answered Delete unused source code from the repository or keep an archive folder?
Jul
16
comment My coworker commits and pushes without testing
@Marco its cool, I've worked those places too, but regardless of the isolation of roles, you were wrong to say support doesn't care about architecture or quality. They certainly care that they receive a crappy product that needs more supporting!
Jul
15
comment Why use a unique hashkey for form submissions?
@MichaelT, true, adding a timestamp and sending a new hash with every response is a good idea to keep an attacker from reusing an old hash token. This will still work with stateless requests, you're simply persisting the authentication status. Most websites work like this with persistent auth stored in a cookie (don't they?)
Jul
15
comment Why use a unique hashkey for form submissions?
hashing algorithms are designed to be very hard to decrypt. They're called "one way encryption" for a reason. Look up SHA256 for an example of one.
Jul
15
comment Why use a unique hashkey for form submissions?
Try This SO question's answers for some insight. You only need a special has that you can compare against one created during authentication so you know subsequent requests are from that user (or really, are not from anyone else)
Jul
15
answered Reading using non-blocking IO on a fd asynchronously in C++ (moving from Node.js)
Jul
15
comment My coworker commits and pushes without testing
@Marco most places I've worked Support is provided by Dev anyway. Who says Support doesn't care about code quality or architecture? Support guys are usually more concerned with correctness - after all, its them who get woken up when something goes wrong. Not every dev team subscribes to writing unit tests either. You make so many assumptions your comment is just wrong. Don't be so disparaging about dedicated people who work hard (eg support).
Jul
15
comment Is there a standard way to indicate that a function returns a new pointer?
if you'd tagged your question C rather than C++ you might get answers in keeping with your original intent. Returning a smart pointer is the right way in C++, in C, there's no convention for naming except to write documentation, eg strdup.
Jul
14
answered How to manage ongoing data migrations?
Jul
14
comment TDD in theory in only
@MetaFight so you dislike writing architecture and design docs, yet you admit you are writing architecture and design docs. I'm not sure what you're saying, unless its that you have a prejudice against some traditional documentation descriptions.
Jul
14
comment Determining game item prices based off of player trades/in-game economy
In a way the price should fluctuate in individual shops (or small, localised areas) This can be updated as goods are bought or sold - eg a shop with a glut of bananas may sell them at a discount, though it might be easier to set the price for the town with all those bananas in it. No reason to limit prices though so they move slowly, might be easier to simply cap the calculation as goods are traded each time, and impose different caps according to the goods shelf-life.
Jul
13
comment My coworker commits and pushes without testing
Let us continue this discussion in chat.