22,020 reputation
14486
bio website thehungersite.com
location United Kingdom
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen 8 hours ago
experienced software engineer with many years in the industry, mostly c++ for large-scale, high-reliability systems.

May
16
answered Would Task-based programming in C++ require new language standard features?
May
15
answered Is it possible to use the Intel C/C++ compiler on Linux to create object files to be linked on Windows?
May
14
answered Distributed system command and control
May
11
comment What is the benefit of the MoSCoW technique?
Yes, I always thought the "Would" was a very poor choice for "we are not going to do this", "Won't" is a much better choice.
May
9
comment Should I open up to .net, c# and visual basic?
Still amazes me how people say VB bad, C# good.. when they're practically the same thing. Different words used in the same syntax. VB technically is the better language, and IDE support is better too - try it and think "why didn't they let C# devs do that". Still, amazing that the lack of curly brackets make the feeble minded get so rattled :-)
May
9
comment Should I open up to .net, c# and visual basic?
not to mention, if you learn Java, you'll also get the opportunity to become an expert in security patching and zero-day exploits :-)
May
9
comment Scrum: Short VS long sprint
we had about 6-8 months of work to do. It just so happened that 6 weeks was good for us and the client who reviewed our deliveries, and that's the point - ignore anyone who says what a sprint should be. Its what makes you most productive. Remember, agile says deliver working software regularly, it does not say 2 weeks. I've worked on 2-week sprints where we had to do a lot of research to make the delivery, at each end the demos were embarrassing in their brevity, and the feedback from them was inconsequential. So we had a lot of overhead for little result. YMMV
May
8
answered For a socket based application : how must I handle dynamic ip adress?
May
8
comment Databases and Unit/Integration Testing
why can't you unit test the DB? If you put your SQL in stored procedures, you can unit-test them with test-defined data, and suddenly everything is easy. This is definitely a best practice more people should follow, see what MS says
May
8
revised Why don't I see many unit test projects that bring up and tear down a DB? (ASP.NET MVC)
added 435 characters in body
May
8
answered Why don't I see many unit test projects that bring up and tear down a DB? (ASP.NET MVC)
May
8
comment Why don't I see many unit test projects that bring up and tear down a DB? (ASP.NET MVC)
you can write data to the DB in the unit test - transactions are great for this as you simply rollback at the end of the test call. You don't need anything fancy like an in-memory DB or a special DB with special data.
May
8
answered Scrum: Short VS long sprint
May
7
comment A weakness of the TDD method?
No, Test Driven Development means start with the test and then add implementation. This is not in keeping with the common frameworks for unit testing however, so people have tended to use the term BDD for the original meaning of TDD. Take a look at Cucumber for the concept. What you describe is writing code, and then writing a test to prove what you've done works. BDD says write the test as a "spec" and then write code that fulfils that specification so you know what you've written does what its supposed to, and works too.
May
6
answered Using third party/ open source controls
May
5
revised Is there a reason that tests aren't written inline with the code that they test?
did his hyperlinks
May
5
comment C++ or C#: Which language is Microsoft going to use in development of future Windows versions?
of course minimising the need for C/C++ could also be written "still has to use C/C++".
May
4
awarded  Nice Question
May
3
comment Task Planning on an Agile Team
all of them. The matra for Agile is "what works for you" because the documented methodology was written down for a different team - not yours. All the agile systems out there should be used as a start-point set of guidelines. Use what helps you, scrap what doesn't help you. The thing to remember is that these processes are not the end-result of what you're trying to do, they are there to hopefully help you, that's all. When you "do scrum" you're still actually trying to deliver products, not manage the scrum process. When that process becomes more important than the work, you know its wrong.
May
2
answered Task Planning on an Agile Team