18,036 reputation
768123
bio website nickchaves.com
location United States
age 32
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jul 23 at 19:56

Web software engineer.

Server (Java, PHP) and UI (JS, CSS)

Designer and photographer on the side.

I'm a serial user of the double __ space after a period — even though people tell me it's obsolete in the computer-world, I can't shake the habit from my 7th grade typing class.

profile for NickC on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


Jun
13
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
13
awarded  Nice Answer
May
3
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
29
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
28
awarded  Nice Answer
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15
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11
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25
awarded  Good Answer
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21
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21
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4
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
26
awarded  Constituent
Feb
26
comment Design Patterns for Javascript
@ErikReppen Thanks, and sorry, I may have been overly sensitive. I am quite experienced with JS, but your comment is fair. Having done quite a bit with Plain Old JS, I look for utilities that abstract the common motions, however, like everything it can be abused. The fact that it is created to act like other languages may encourage that abuse. I've seen organizations with large teams and lots of code go the class/module route, but I admit not without producing your readability complaint. And I can agree that composition is a good thing; would love to see that as an answer on this question.
Feb
19
awarded  Caucus
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30
awarded  Guru
Dec
21
awarded  Favorite Question
Dec
16
comment Is jQuery an example of “god object” antipattern?
@RossPatterson Are you disagreeing? If you are, I'd encourage you to post your own answer. I think Laurent's is good, but I'm still undecided.
Dec
16
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
16
comment Is jQuery an example of “god object” antipattern?
But it returns a "jQuery" object which contains much of the jQuery API -- and, I think, would be the "God" object the OP is referring to.
Dec
12
comment Should the 12-String be in its own class and why?
Some part of me wonders whether the idea to model objects having strings with strings was a test, or just from someone with a punny sense of humor. Also, to answer your question about String[] vs. char[] maybe because you could tune the string up or down a half step to flats or sharps?